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I have been reading the tire recommendations here for 4 years now. Many good posts and reviews!

I've been running the stock tires since 2016 but now it is time to decide on my first ever ATV replacement tires.

My biggest concern is traction on my cement driveway while plowing heavy snow. Probably any good tire will work for my trail riding as the stock tires did very well to keep me out of trouble. (I am not a balls-deep mud-hole type of rider...I go around those obstacles.)

So my questions are focused on improving traction while snow-plowing on relatively level cement (without using tire chains)

Has anyone found a superior snow-traction tire? Do you think a heavier (ply rating and actual weight) tire is better?
 

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There are not many tires out there that are going to improve your traction for plowing snow on cement.

To improve traction you would need to go to a tire that has more surface area while allowing treads to bite into the snow. That along with more weight on top of the Kodiak will help quite a bit. There have been times that I have placed a few cinder blocks onto the front and rear racks and then tied them down to get more weight to plow easier.
 
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If you have 14" wheels you COULD use automotive snow tires lol.
 

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I had the same quest and my research lead me to Kenda Bear Claws as my best option for all around tire (plowing, trails, mud, etc.). Went with 26鈥. Used them for everything except plowing so far and they鈥檝e been great.
 

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Well for starters, your driveway is concrete, not cement. Now that that misconception is out of the way, on with the tires. Ideally, you will want a chevron "V" pattern tire, or a bar/paddle tire, and not a blocky/knobby tire. Softer rubber is awesome for cold traction, but will reduce tread life in the warmer weather. The giant deep lug mud tires generally work ok for deep snow but the rubber is too hard at low temperatures therefore reducing traction on hard pack snow and ice.
The general misconception most have is that they want a deep lug for plowing to wade snow, but it's usually only in deep snow briefly, the majority of the time, you are on freshly plowed ground directly behind your plow. You are better off with a slightly shallower tread, with more lugs, than with bigger deeper lugs that span over bar areas of the tire, they have big voids that are great for ejecting mud.
The best traction you can get on snow is actually more snow, that's the key principle being automotive snow and ice tires, lots of little Sipes to bite in and grab snow to act as traction against the snow.
No well most of your general purpose all terrain tires are not going to be full of Sipes like a winter tire for a car, your next best bet is just to find something with a lot of small lugs. A couple of decent choices are the bar style like a Maxis big Horn, or a Chevron style with a lot of small lugs similar to a swamp lite or a reptile radial.
A bear claw htr could be a good choice also.


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I had the same quest and my research lead me to Kenda Bear Claws as my best option for all around tire (plowing, trails, mud, etc.). Went with 26鈥. Used them for everything except plowing so far and they鈥檝e been great.
The good old bear claw k299 was the king of tires in its day, prob why it's still available. They were good at everything, not great at just one thing. A true all terrain. The new bear claw htr seems to be following in the same path. The k299 did pretty well plowing, you should have no issues. That's why I mentioned the htr to the OP. It looks like it should work really well too.

I've used knock off big horns, mud lites, k299, and reptile radials in the snow, all have done well except the mud lites, once they spin, the just drug straight down, but if you keep forward momentum they either well. The other 3, work really well, and when they spin, they still naturally try to move forward instead of deep down.

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...your next best bet is just to find something with a lot of small lugs. A couple of decent choices are the bar style like a Maxis big Horn, or a Chevron style with a lot of small lugs similar to a swamp lite or a reptile radial.
A bear claw htr could be a good choice also.
I've been using BigHorn originals plowing multiple seasons now. My plow setup is a front mount 60" blade which can create quite the load to push with a full swipe in a decent snow storm. I do use 4x4 for proper traction as I don't add extra weight to the bike. Traction is pretty good for plowing but I do feel there would be other tires performing better however, I'm not going to go and spend money on a dedicated plowing set of tires.

For a different perspective and simply riding in the snow (not plowing), the offset tires (26x9x12 & 26x12x12) are not ideal, I would prefer to be running a square setup. With the offset tires, rear wheel tracking can be a PITA and in many cases not desirable. I don't believe this issue falls on the BigHorns tread pattern as the problem, it is the width difference and I believe that will happen with just about any tire that is run with offset widths. I'm no expert, just an observation.
 

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How would tracking be effected?
 

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The front tires either creating tracks or following other's tracks with that specific front wheel to wheel width. Then the rear tires not fitting the same wheel to wheel width with the tires being ~3" wider on each. Kind of hard to explain but I've had the backend get a bit squirrelly as it tracks in and out of the actual tracks jumping left or right in the rear. I've experienced that situation multiple times on my previous 07 Grizzly 700. I have not got this 14 Grizzly out in similar conditions yet but would expect similar since the rear wheel to wheel width and tires are wider. Usually the effect is worse when following in other's tracks.

Only difference I can think of is the 07 had Yamaha spec'd OEM wheel sizes with 1" spacers and 14 has identical ITP 12x7" wheels on all four. Both wheels with BigHorn (F) 26x9x12 & (R) 26x12x12. But again, I've not got the 14 out on trail in snow yet. Typical trail snow conditions would be CO light, fluffy snow 2 ft deep. Some tracked, some not. Snow conditions in CO and UT is definitely different than back east snow.
 

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The front tires either creating tracks or following other's tracks with that specific front wheel to wheel width. Then the rear tires not fitting the same wheel to wheel width with the tires being ~3" wider on each. Kind of hard to explain but I've had the backend get a bit squirrelly as it tracks in and out of the actual tracks jumping left or right in the rear. I've experienced that situation multiple times on my previous 07 Grizzly 700. I have not got this 14 Grizzly out in similar conditions yet but would expect similar since the rear wheel to wheel width and tires are wider. Usually the effect is worse when following in other's tracks.

Only difference I can think of is the 07 had Yamaha spec'd OEM wheel sizes with 1" spacers and 14 has identical ITP 12x7" wheels on all four. Both wheels with BigHorn (F) 26x9x12 & (R) 26x12x12. But again, I've not got the 14 out on trail in snow yet. Typical trail snow conditions would be CO light, fluffy snow 2 ft deep. Some tracked, some not. Snow conditions in CO and UT is definitely different than back east snow.
I guess it could, I've never had that issue on any bike. Then again, I tend to create my own trail due to the stupidity of others that seem to find a need to wonder all over a trail instead of sticking to a straight line in thier side of the trail. Lol

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Thanks for clarifying the cement vs concrete. I was worried somebody actually dumped bags of cement out there...
You're welcome, glad I could be of service. Lol

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I also have Reptiles, but I live in South Carolina. I haven鈥檛 tried them in snow yet. But they get really good reviews for snow and ice, and I concur they have good traction. Mine are a little out-of-balance though
 

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Just remember that when you are plowing snow you are not necessarily driving through snow but on concrete that has had the snow cleared by the blade in front of the machine. And if there is any snow it should be very little, but there may be ice.
 
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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
As expected a lot of great replies and I will start looking at your suggested tire options.

Thank you all for your responses!!!

Cement v Concrete LOL! (I'll try to remember the difference)

Merriam Webster says:
"Cement is far older than concrete, and as far back as the 14th century had a meaning that today would make many people say 鈥測ou mean concrete, not cement.鈥 For hundreds and hundreds of years people used cement to refer to walls, floors, foundations, and the like, without anyone getting hot under the collar."

"You may, if you wish, continue to distinguish between cement and concrete, and we understand that there are many circumstances in which it is useful to do so. But this distinction is, in the relative scheme of things, a recent one, and those people who use cement to refer to 鈥渁 hard strong building material鈥 are not violating one of the basic principles of our language."
 

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As expected a lot of great replies and I will start looking at your suggested tire options.

Thank you all for your responses!!!

Cement v Concrete LOL! (I'll try to remember the difference)

Merriam Webster says:
"Cement is far older than concrete, and as far back as the 14th century had a meaning that today would make many people say 鈥測ou mean concrete, not cement.鈥 For hundreds and hundreds of years people used cement to refer to walls, floors, foundations, and the like, without anyone getting hot under the collar."

"You may, if you wish, continue to distinguish between cement and concrete, and we understand that there are many circumstances in which it is useful to do so. But this distinction is, in the relative scheme of things, a recent one, and those people who use cement to refer to 鈥渁 hard strong building material鈥 are not violating one of the basic principles of our language."
Lol I always correct people, I just get a kick out of it. I love when they say it's the same thing and I get to give a lesson. Lol
I blame it on my buddies dad, he worked for a concrete place and as a kid, he corrected me over and over when I was at thier place or if there invited me asking for a road trip..... He brainwashed me into correcting people.

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I also have Reptiles, but I live in South Carolina. I haven鈥檛 tried them in snow yet. But they get really good reviews for snow and ice, and I concur they have good traction. Mine are a little out-of-balance though
Yeah my reptiles have been amazing at everything. They work very well in the snow and on ice. Can actually giver on groomed sled trails and not tear them up yet still have great grip. Sledders appreciate that.
My only complaint is they really pick up small marble size pebbles and fire them up into the fenders and out in front of the bike. I find the noise annoying at times, but it's only at slower speeds I notice it, once going faster, the engine noise and air by my ears mutes the rocks. But at speed they fire out infront, slow down and I catch up to them... Chest, and a few to my chin and lips. It hurts. Lol


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The front tires either creating tracks or following other's tracks with that specific front wheel to wheel width. Then the rear tires not fitting the same wheel to wheel width with the tires being ~3" wider on each. Kind of hard to explain but I've had the backend get a bit squirrelly as it tracks in and out of the actual tracks jumping left or right in the rear. I've experienced that situation multiple times on my previous 07 Grizzly 700. I have not got this 14 Grizzly out in similar conditions yet but would expect similar since the rear wheel to wheel width and tires are wider. Usually the effect is worse when following in other's tracks.

Only difference I can think of is the 07 had Yamaha spec'd OEM wheel sizes with 1" spacers and 14 has identical ITP 12x7" wheels on all four. Both wheels with BigHorn (F) 26x9x12 & (R) 26x12x12. But again, I've not got the 14 out on trail in snow yet. Typical trail snow conditions would be CO light, fluffy snow 2 ft deep. Some tracked, some not. Snow conditions in CO and UT is definitely different than back east snow.
This is true. My skinny growler set up tracks much better in snow then my 11" wide growlers did. The wider tires tend to get squirly.

Not sure if any of that applies to plowing.
 
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