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Both the base model with steel wheels, and the eps modles with cast aluminum wheels list seperate part numbers for front and rear wheels. They are 2 different rims. Atv. Com is one of the most inaccurate places I've ever tried to source information, i learned to skip that site all together.

@Wingnut, you are correct about atv being the same as 4x4 trucks & jeeps. A narrow tire is much better in the winter. It cuts through snow, 12" wide doesn't really provide enough extra flotation to make much difference, but it's resistance as it sinks abs tries to cut through the snow will be very noticeable.
As for traction, in winter, you gain way more traction with correct tread compound and tread siping, than you would ever gain from a larger contact patch on a tire with no siping and harder rubber. The best traction you can get is snow on snow, abs that's what siping is, tiny groves in winter tread that open and grab little bits of snow in the tread, and as those bits contact the snow on the ground, you get insane traction. Hense the reason you look at the top winter tires for vehicles, age they aren't big blocky tread, they are smoother but with lots of tiny grooves.

So a downfall to wide tires on the front, hard steering, even with eps. That's the myth that everyone believes, Eps isn't there to make steering easier 100% of the time on an atv. It's primarily there to absorb the the shock and impact of objects on the trail. Putting the stress of a wide tire in there is going to wear that eps motor out much fadter along with your other front steering/suspension componets.

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2021 Kodiak 700-EPS, EHS tuner, airbox & lid, HMF Titan (Quiet) exhaust, Warn 2500 winch & 52" plow.
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Both the base model with steel wheels, and the eps modles with cast aluminum wheels list seperate part numbers for front and rear wheels. They are 2 different rims. Atv. Com is one of the most inaccurate places I've ever tried to source information, i learned to skip that site all together.

@Wingnut, you are correct about atv being the same as 4x4 trucks & jeeps. A narrow tire is much better in the winter. It cuts through snow, 12" wide doesn't really provide enough extra flotation to make much difference, but it's resistance as it sinks abs tries to cut through the snow will be very noticeable.
As for traction, in winter, you gain way more traction with correct tread compound and tread siping, than you would ever gain from a larger contact patch on a tire with no siping and harder rubber. The best traction you can get is snow on snow, abs that's what siping is, tiny groves in winter tread that open and grab little bits of snow in the tread, and as those bits contact the snow on the ground, you get insane traction. Hense the reason you look at the top winter tires for vehicles, age they aren't big blocky tread, they are smoother but with lots of tiny grooves.

So a downfall to wide tires on the front, hard steering, even with eps. That's the myth that everyone believes, Eps isn't there to make steering easier 100% of the time on an atv. It's primarily there to absorb the the shock and impact of objects on the trail. Putting the stress of a wide tire in there is going to wear that eps motor out much fadter along with your other front steering/suspension componets.

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@CanadianKodiak700,

All great points, and I agree with all of them. Back in my early duck hunting days, we'd sometimes make our way to remote lakes back in the woods through relatively deep snows in 4WD Broncos, Jeeps or whatever, and every one of them was equipped with tall, aggressive, and narrow mud and snow tires, and in summer, all of the dune buggy guys had the big, fat, high-flotation tires you've referenced here, which were great on sand and rock. So what you and others have said here is perfectly consistent with that.

Honestly, I'm not quite sure what I was thinking when I first posted this thread? I guess part of me was wondering if the super aggressive, big lug tires typical of current day quads would somehow change those dynamics in snow? In my mind's eye, they seem to make perfect sense for something like mud, because with those big deep lugs, they would function almost like a paddlewheel, moving high volumes of mud at full throttle. But then, in snow (including while plowing), you're not typically moving at higher speeds. So I guess they're just a different phenomenon altogether.

Anyway, it's all great food for thought, and for discussion, so I thank you for sharing your thoughts on it.(y)
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Actually, given what I've now learned about this topic, I probably should have left the stock (OEM) 25" 8x12 and 10x12 tires on mine, rather than going up in both height and width?

Oh well! Live and learn, as they say.
 

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More, I'm a firm believer that a 25" tire is a tad too small for these bikes. 26" should be stock size, and a 27 or 28 should be typical upgrade size.
Toss a 26" tire on these bikes, in most cases, you will never notice any loss of power unless a very heavy tire or has huge lugs which puts the majority of the weight out where you feel it's effects most.
Wider, yeah, not a fan of going much wider. Front 8 to 9 & rear 10 to 11 isn't too bad, but there are some 10" fronts abs 12 or 12.5" rears is just too much rubber to turn efficiently IMO.

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Yeah, I agree. I haven't noticed any real performance changes in going from 25" to 26", but it's sounding more and more like my 26x12" rear Bighorn might have been a rather impulsive mistake. Maybe not a "huge" mistake (?), but for 95% use on snow, the 10" might have been better.
 

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eh, I used the BigHorn 26x12x12 on the rear for many years and was mostly satisfied. I did notice that on snow, tracking was a bit off because of the front width to rear width difference. The back could jump around a little if you were riding ruts and the snow was not fresh. I too agree that 26" diameter is about the perfect size for a trail riding tire. Consider that the Zilla 27x14 tire has been reported by many to be about 26 1/4" tall, so it runs a bit short. But back to that 26" diameter thing.

I actually wanted to go down in width primarily to reduce the amount of rotational weight in the rear for a bit more sporty feeling. IIRC, I may have reduce the rotational weight by somewhere around 10 lbs for both tires. Again, back to the altitude thing... but our machines are down on power so it makes sense to gain back power where you can.
 

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eh, I used the BigHorn 26x12x12 on the rear for many years and was mostly satisfied. I did notice that on snow, tracking was a bit off because of the front width to rear width difference. The back could jump around a little if you were riding ruts and the snow was not fresh. I too agree that 26" diameter is about the perfect size for a trail riding tire. Consider that the Zilla 27x14 tire has been reported by many to be about 26 1/4" tall, so it runs a bit short. But back to that 26" diameter thing.

I actually wanted to go down in width primarily to reduce the amount of rotational weight in the rear for a bit more sporty feeling. IIRC, I may have reduce the rotational weight by somewhere around 10 lbs for both tires. Again, back to the altitude thing... but our machines are down on power so it makes sense to gain back power where you can.
Going from 11" wide rear growlers to 9" all around reduced my rear axle rotating mass by 17 lbs. In my case it made a noticeable difference on both my 550 and current 700
 

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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
Yeah, I don't think I'll really know about true "power" until I'm actually in deeper snows with the plow next winter, but it sure doesn't seem to lack power going up steep hills and such, particularly now, since it's running a bit richer from the newly added tuner. I haven't got it truly dialed-in just yet, because it's still a tad rich at idle and it hesitates a tad on the mid-range (so I might have to alter the timing on that one setting?), but I don't think I'll have any real power issues come winter. Hell, anymore, it barely snows anyway! So this whole ATV adventure of mine could end-up being a $13,000 boondoggle! :rolleyes:
 

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When you are plowing deeper snows you should be down into low gear so you might not even notice the power difference.

Now if you are out playing around in deeper snow you just may notice the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
When you are plowing deeper snows you should be down into low gear so you might not even notice the power difference.
Yup, I suspect that's true. ;)
 
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