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Colvin.. with a name like 'SNUD RUN' is gotta be a great place.
They had like 4000 atv’s last year, it gets bigger every year. And I misspoke it’s called snirt run - for snow dirt . The local atv park Tall pines in Andover theirs is snud - snow mud .
 

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Snirt sounds good. I'm afraid that the real mudders would consider me a 'prissy bee-auch ' until we climb some hills. Sounds like the place to be. Red
 

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Wouldn't the bigger, wider tires on the front of the Grizzly account for the turning radius difference or is there something mechanical causing it?
 

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My understanding is that the Kodiac chassis is the previous generation Grizzly,thus the manual 4x4 lever on the base Kodiac 700 whereas the base Kodiac 450 has the push button. I may. Completely off but I understand the difference to be different chassis
and thus different steering angle/geometry? Not so much the square 10 in widest. Correct me if I'm wrong gentlemen


.
 

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I love my Kodiak, I am 70 so I like the fact it sits a little lower swinging my leg over the seat is a small problem for me. When I have my wife on the back its undoubtedly easier to board the machine vs the Kodiak which sits higher. It would be nice to have power steering but it wasn't in the budget at the time. It is just one more thing that can require service though. I have 80 acres of forest property and my trees are planted 10 to 12 ft apart and I am always towing something so the tighter turn radius is a plus. I have never been underpowered towing my DR Tow behind brush cutter. (oiriginal version its a tank) In fact it has power to spare. I have a warn wench. I do allot of stop and go I might start my machine 20 to 30 times a day. I go through starter solenoids about one a year average and one starter in 4 years. But thats not a fault in my opinion. I change my oil every 50 hours fluids every two years. I put an hour meter on it when I bought it to keep track. I run ITP mud lite tires nice big knobs for traction. A great value this machine I have neverr regretted it. I did add the Grizzly hitch a must for under a $100 if you tow anything.
 

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I have a house in the ADK's as well, North Creek area. Have had Honda's mostly, still running an '88 Fourtrax 300, so am also new to the Yamaha's. I also have a '12 Yamaha Tenere that I bring up to the ADK's on occasion as you can really get yourself lost on all the backroads.

I bought my '20 Kodiak EPS SE last fall, but have not gotten too much seat time yet due to all this COVID lock down stuff. Thing I noticed almost right away is the Kodiak "just" fits thru many of the trails I run in the Summer. These are sled trails and are a bit clearer in the winter. Several trails would have needed trimming to fit the Grizz I think, or maybe just riding a bit slower to clear stuff but that's no fun :).

So far I like the Kodiak, I tend to do a good amount of exploring and rock crawling and the belt drive setup is a bit trickier to throttle thru very technical terrain than my Honda's, but the Kodiak is more of a runner on the more open trails. Trade offs I guess, if Honda had an 800 class Rincon w/Low Range and EPS I may have gone that route, but the Yamaha will get the job done.
 

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Welcome to the forum. Have you tried using low gear in the slow technical trails you described?
 

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Afishyo is absolutely correct in suggesting low 2WD. I was slightly surprised at the sensitivity of the throttle in 2WD high in the tight woods and when moving the loaded trailer where precision is required. Have spent a great deal of time in VERY TIGHT timber and in 2WD low She dances with precision..much better control and plenty of speed.
 

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In comparing the Kodiak and Grizzly... I believe there is a difference in width. The Griz is maybe 4” wider? Not exactly sure. But that would play into the turning radius. Also makes it more stable. A lot of us have upgraded to stiffer tires and added wheel spacers to obtain a touch more stability on the Kodiak.
 

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The Grizz is not 4" wider. Official chassis dimensions are..
Kodiak 700 WB 49.2" WIDTH 46.5
Grizzly 700 WB 48.4" WIDTH 46.5
... many people relegate the Kodiac to a second tier status however the
2020 base Kodiac 700 is the 2015 and earlier Grizzly. When owners of 2015 and earlier models call their ride indestructible they are describing the current Kodiak 700. Correct me if I am mistaken. Red
In comparing the Kodiak and Grizzly... I believe there is a difference in width. The Griz is maybe 4” wider? Not exactly sure. But that would play into the turning radius. Also makes it more stable. A lot of us have upgraded to stiffer tires and added wheel spacers to obtain a touch more stability on the Kodiak.
Correction the Grizzly width is officially 48.4" and wheelbase is 49.2.
Not all sites are accurate.
 

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Approximately 2" wider. The WB is obviously the same. However the Kodiak has turning radius of 126" vs 146inches for the Grizz. This does render the Kodiak a bit more nimble for tight woods but the Grizzly has better high speed stability. Kodiak is preferable on off camber with the lower center of gravity. I'm considering wheel spacers to widen footprint.
 

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What I see is that we are not racing these machines where we need to take some high speed turns.

There are some on here that just may do that and need the little bit wider stance with spacers but I have taken my Kodiak into places that even a 2" wider machine wouldn't go. I have also never felt that it was that bad in corners, but then I just slow down when I come to one and don't see any need to take them so fast that I need better stability.
 

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man i have ridden my kodiak through pretty much all terrain except sand and snow, in spots it shouldnt probably have been.

I been on some steep incline/declines.. deep mud, rock creeks and water..

I dunno, from screwing around in the woods and then using this thing around the yard, i am pretty much on it every day, I dont really know how you can ask for a better all around 4 wheeler

and I just have the base kodiak, and most time its in 2wd...
 

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Same for me. Have to look hard to find complaints. I don't want to screw up a well engineered product with poorly selected mods.
 

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The Grizz is not 4" wider. Official chassis dimensions are..
Kodiak 700 WB 49.2" WIDTH 46.5
Grizzly 700 WB 48.4" WIDTH 46.5
... many people relegate the Kodiac to a second tier status however the
2020 base Kodiac 700 is the 2015 and earlier Grizzly. When owners of 2015 and earlier models call their ride indestructible they are describing the current Kodiak 700. Correct me if I am mistaken. Red

Correction the Grizzly width is officially 48.4" and wheelbase is 49.2.
Not all sites are accurate.
As a side note, it is the 2014 Grizzly that came with the 30mm increased length in a-arms and longer shocks than the previous year Grizzly. So, 2014 is the year the Grizzly became 2" wider in the wheel/suspension stance. I also verified that the 16-18 Grizzly has the exact same front/rear upper/lower a-arm part numbers used on the 14/15 Grizzly.

What I am curious about is if the main frame ever got widened as I have never seen anyone post measurements of it. When looking at the frames from a 14 Grizzly and comparing to a 16 Kodiak, those are different frame part numbers but also by way of the drawn schematics, the frames are slightly different. But that is a drawing so not something to completely draw any conclusions from. However, the different part numbers on the frames is a fact. Im curious about this whole frame thing more so for just curiosities sake :geek:
 
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Excellent info and and post .I'm afraid that I am not positive about the central frame spec changes on the Grizz ..interesting that the wheel base is the same with a very significant difference in turning radius. Still not exactly certain the reason. Any Yamaha mechanics out there who can clarify? Get lots of speculation on this subject.
 

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Gotta agree with you fully JimP. My base Kodiak 700 has all the performance I require. The only mods I would consider must improve agility and traction (tires). Would not tolerate any reduction in reliability. More amazed at the capability of today's Quads every time I ride and 'explore ' the ability that is in excess of my own.
 

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So here is some added information to my last post about shared parts and such, related to Kodiak 700 and Grizzly 700 widths.

I went and confirmed that the Kodiak 2016-2018 share the same a-arm (I only checked lower a-arms) part numbers, both front and rear, with the Grizzly 700/550 2007-2013.

Kodiak 2019+ do have different lower a-arm part numbers but the change in number is the minor number change. For example, 2018 Kodiak 700 front left lower a-arm is part #1HP-F3570-00-00. The 2019+ Kodiak front left lower a-arm is part #1HP-F3570-10-00.

Repeating my previous post, the 2014/15 Grizzly 700/550 share the same lower a-arm part numbers for both front and rear with the Grizzly 700 2016-2018.

@CanadianKodiak700 pointed this out to me on GC in my a-arm skid 4-sale thread a while back but I never fully looked into it until yesterday. Again, I don't have confirmation on frame width between the different years and models but I'm assuming frame widths are either the same or very close to each other between all of the Kodiak and Grizzly 700 models. I am of the belief that it is the difference in suspension (a-arms/shocks) part numbers for the reasoning behind the wider stance and turning radius for the Grizzly versus the Kodiak.

This mostly means that those who would prefer a wider stance by way of suspension on a Kodiak can most likely achieve that goal by replacing all of the suspension components. A pretty costly way to do it while much easier achieved by adding spacers or wheels with different offset. I would expect the turning radius to also increase for any of those changes.

Again, I don't have proof on my assumptions for the Grizzly versus Kodiak frame widths with those frames definitely having different part numbers, but I am of belief they are probably the same width where the a-arms bolt on or very close.
 

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So here is some added information to my last post about shared parts and such, related to Kodiak 700 and Grizzly 700 widths.

I went and confirmed that the Kodiak 2016-2018 share the same a-arm (I only checked lower a-arms) part numbers, both front and rear, with the Grizzly 700/550 2007-2013.

Kodiak 2019+ do have different lower a-arm part numbers but the change in number is the minor number change. For example, 2018 Kodiak 700 front left lower a-arm is part #1HP-F3570-00-00. The 2019+ Kodiak front left lower a-arm is part #1HP-F3570-10-00.

Repeating my previous post, the 2014/15 Grizzly 700/550 share the same lower a-arm part numbers for both front and rear with the Grizzly 700 2016-2018.

@CanadianKodiak700 pointed this out to me on GC in my a-arm skid 4-sale thread a while back but I never fully looked into it until yesterday. Again, I don't have confirmation on frame width between the different years and models but I'm assuming frame widths are either the same or very close to each other between all of the Kodiak and Grizzly 700 models. I am of the belief that it is the difference in suspension (a-arms/shocks) part numbers for the reasoning behind the wider stance and turning radius for the Grizzly versus the Kodiak.

This mostly means that those who would prefer a wider stance by way of suspension on a Kodiak can most likely achieve that goal by replacing all of the suspension components. A pretty costly way to do it while much easier achieved by adding spacers or wheels with different offset. I would expect the turning radius to also increase for any of those changes.

Again, I don't have proof on my assumptions for the Grizzly versus Kodiak frame widths with those frames definitely having different part numbers, but I am of belief they are probably the same width where the a-arms bolt on or very close.
Problem is adding spacers to a Kodiak will help stability but will not perform as plush as the longer shocks and control arm of the 14 to 20 Grizzly. And don't forget if one wanted to add the shocks and control arms of a Grizzly to a Kodiak, all four axles would also need to be changed as they are also longer.
 
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