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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Good morning all,

I have been trying to fix these rear brakes for about 2 months now. I am going to start from the beginning. I bought a used 2016 Yamaha Kodiak SE. When I took the bike for a test ride I only went about 1/4 of a mile and don't remember having to use the brakes during the test ride. I only went a short distance and not very fast. Well, when I got home I noticed that the rear brake lever was rusted in place and I couldn't move it by pushing with my foot. So I was able to get it off the mount, 2 hours later by using a construction grade lube and a lot of muscle power. LOL. I removed the rust by sanding the mount and by greasing it. It works fine now. I adjusted the levers and got them tight, but I had zero braking power with the rear brakes.I could actually stand on the rear brake lever and it had zero affect. I had made 2-3 post concerning this , asking member if they had experienced this. Most of the responses said to change the differential oil. In all my years of working on bikes and lawn mowers, chainsaws, weed trimmers, etc. , I was thinking, yeah right, changing the oil out is not going to help a thing. Boy was I fooled. I drained all the old oil out , then drove the bike down the road approximately 1/4 mile and pressed the brakes with my foot, the rear tires locked up. I was amazed. So, I tried it again, now with the left side hand lever, same thing, the brakes began working properly. I raced back to my barn, in amazement, and filled the differential with fresh THF and now the brakes are working like they should. I have attached a picture of the oil and it has a shade of grey in it. I guess that is metal shavings from the gears.
 

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Glad you got them to work properly.

I would say that there was water contamination in the rear diff. What does it feel like when you rub it between your thumb and finger?
 

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Maybe it's just the way you worded it, but did you drive your bike for 1/4 miles without fluid in the rear diff?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Maybe it's just the way you worded it, but did you drive your bike for 1/4 miles without fluid in the rear diff?
Yes, but I listened for any excessive metal to metal grinding in the rear housing and heard none. It didn't even feel like it was grinding, without fluid. I just left the plug open so I could get all that grey looking fluid out.
 

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Yes, but I listened for any excessive metal to metal grinding in the rear housing and heard none. It didn't even feel like it was grinding, without fluid. I just left the plug open so I could get all that grey looking fluid out.
You should NEVER run your bike without oil in your differential. Lord knows what damage may come from it......
 

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Uh oh.....a see a bit of a headache a coming your way. Like other things in life,sometimes things go better with lube! If you don't develop issues with the final drive after this.......you dodged a bullet.
 

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Hopefully there was enough lube left on your clutch packs for the brakes that they will be fine. It isn't a good idea to run a wet brake type system without fluid on them.

the gears should be fine but you have to worry about bearing wear down the road.
 

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There without be more than enough lube still coating the gears and the brakes to keep it lubed for a 1/4 mile and back

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There should of been but with the old fluid being contaminated and causing problems the question was it enough..
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
There should of been but with the old fluid being contaminated and causing problems the question was it enough..
Like Canadian Kodiak stated , it was only about a quarter of a mile that I traveled before I filled it back up with fluid. I doubt very serious if any damage was done.
 

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Like Canadian Kodiak stated , it was only about a quarter of a mile that I traveled before I filled it back up with fluid. I doubt very serious if any damage was done.
There without be more than enough lube still coating the gears and the brakes to keep it lubed for a 1/4 mile and back

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Believe whatever you wish.

That was a still a stupid / foolish practice to say the least and best never repeated....
 

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....
 

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Believe whatever you wish.

That was a still a stupid / foolish practice to say the least and best never repeated....
I didn't say it was a smart idea, I'm just saying that there is little chance that there would be any damage done concidering it would have still been lightly coated with oil, contaminated or not, it would still provide some lubrication. If it has been cleaned right out with solvents, or has been a new, never used gearset, and driven on... Yeah, totally different outcome.

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Believe whatever you wish.

That was a still a stupid / foolish practice to say the least and best never repeated....
Well , "Vincent", this is not the place to call or say anyone is "stupid". I can tell by your comment that you are not very smart when it comes to mechanics. It would take a lot longer to mess up the gears than the distance I traveled. And to correct you, the clutches are lubed and cooled by the engine oil, not the transmission gear oil. I only left the plug out of the rear chunk to make sure all the old oil was expelled when I went down the road for about 1/4 of a mile and only going about 5 mph. Now call someone else stupid Pal.
 

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The brake clutches are cooled and lubed by the rear end fluid.

This is why you need to use a GL4 rated rear end fluid

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Well, Vincent does have a bit of history on this Forum to believe that he has plenty knowledge on the subject. Stupid may have been a little bold of a word, and probably not meant to offend, but educate.

These machines are super tough. But the oil pulls the heat away from all the moving parts. And you may just want to be cautious if you do any wilderness rides(maybe not go too far from the vehicle), incase something does show its self.
 
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Well , "Vincent", this is not the place to call or say anyone is "stupid". I can tell by your comment that you are not very smart when it comes to mechanics. It would take a lot longer to mess up the gears than the distance I traveled. And to correct you, the clutches are lubed and cooled by the engine oil, not the transmission gear oil. I only left the plug out of the rear chunk to make sure all the old oil was expelled when I went down the road for about 1/4 of a mile and only going about 5 mph. Now call someone else stupid Pal.
Actually your "wet brake" system is located in your rear differential, witch basically a clutch pack and requires constant lubrication and cooling from your rear diff oil...hence why others suggested you change your rear diff fluid.

Your bike is also equipped with a "wet clutch" system for transmitting power to your primary sheave, that is cooled and lubricated by your engine oil. This is not a clutch pack style but actually a centrifugal clutch and drum system.


I'm an industrial mechanic by trade. Work on equipment worth 100k to millions of dollars on a daily basis. So your right, I don't know nothing about mechanics...;)
 
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Gears may not take damage in short run like that but the bearings might. Even at 5mph the rollers are moving at a pretty good speed and rubbing against the cage without lube. On a normal diff I'd run some diesel fuel for a VERY short distance to get moisture out as it still has some lubrication property and sucks up moisture. With the clutch pack wet brakes I wouldn't even do the diesel trick as you don't want to "impregnate" the clutch material with anything other than the proper Friction modified oil.
 

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I agree with Vincent. I am also a millwright and I've seen how quick heat from lack of lubrication can destroy things.
 

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I agree with Vincent. I am also a millwright and I've seen how quick heat from lack of lubrication can destroy things.
Hello fellow millwright, Thanks for tuning in!
 
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