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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)

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Interesting results so far.

I wouldn't have looked at any of the top 8 for my machines. I'm looking forward to seeinhow the rest shake out and what they tested.


For where I ride It's steep hills, large rocks, and mostly decomposed granite. Or Snow over Decomposed granite. Mud really isn't an big issue.

While there are things I don't like about them The Maxxis Big Horn 2.0 has been my go to.

It may be time to expand my horizon.
 

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Knock on wood I've had pretty good luck so far with the plain old stock tires on my Kodiak. That little bugger will go thru some stuff. The biggest downfall I've run into is the really deep wet snow.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Knock on wood I've had pretty good luck so far with the plain old stock tires on my Kodiak. That little bugger will go thru some stuff. The biggest downfall I've run into is the really deep wet snow.
I was a little surprised they didn't use a set of stock tires as part of the test. Quite a few people have said they work pretty good, but no one seems to buy them again.
 

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Everyone wants something better and think that they can improve on what the stock tire is. Then once they purchase another set of tires for $600+ they run them and then try to find something better again.

I run mostly on dry, rocky ground and the stock tires do quite well. Even when I have gotten into the slick clay soils while hunting they have gotten me through it with no problem. But as I said above once the stock tires are wore out I'll go to something else to see how they will do.
 

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Everyone wants something better and think that they can improve on what the stock tire is. Then once they purchase another set of tires for $600+ they run them and then try to find something better again.

I run mostly on dry, rocky ground and the stock tires do quite well. Even when I have gotten into the slick clay soils while hunting they have gotten me through it with no problem. But as I said above once the stock tires are wore out I'll go to something else to see how they will do.
This is exactly my theory. I'm also too cheap to just swap out these perfectly good stock tires for the next newest latest and greatest go fast turn sharp mud flinging wonder tire. I'm sure I will drink the kool-aid and try out a different tire when I wear the stock out.
 

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I'm cheap I run the stock tire until they need replaced. I will say going from stock to the BH 2.0 was like having a different machine. While I didn't have any real complaints with the stock tire. The new ones were incredible when it came to traction and sliding around corners.

I will run the tires on my new machines until they need replaced and see what is on the market when it's time.
 

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I think the decision of ditching the stock tires depends on your location and type of riding conditions. I had always kept stock until they wore out, then I moved to Alaska. I won't even consider running stock tires now after seeing the difference. Not good for my wallet but in my opinion is the single most important upgrade to the machine.
 

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I'm pretty cheap so I tend to run the stock tires until they wear out . . . but I really dislike the stock tires that come with the Kodiak (heck, most stock tires that come with most ATVs) for the simple fact that they are most always 2-4 ply thick and I invariably end up with a plug or two (or six) in a tire (or two tires) well before the tire is worn out.

While I realize even thicker ply tires can get holed by a stick or rock, I much prefer 6-8 ply tires for the simple fact that they seem to hold up better and longer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I'm pretty cheap so I tend to run the stock tires until they wear out . . . but I really dislike the stock tires that come with the Kodiak (heck, most stock tires that come with most ATVs) for the simple fact that they are most always 2-4 ply thick and I invariably end up with a plug or two (or six) in a tire (or two tires) well before the tire is worn out.

While I realize even thicker ply tires can get holed by a stick or rock, I much prefer 6-8 ply tires for the simple fact that they seem to hold up better and longer.
Are you plugging these on the trail?
I'm familiar with doing that on a motorcycle or car tire, but what do you use for the thin ATV tires? Does a CO2 canister do the trick for pumping them back up?
 

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Are you plugging these on the trail?
I'm familiar with doing that on a motorcycle or car tire, but what do you use for the thin ATV tires? Does a CO2 canister do the trick for pumping them back up?

Oops . . . missed seeing this question until just now.


Plugged trail-side. Last year on one of the first rides of the year I had two flats and ended up needing something like 7 or 8 plugs.


After plugging them you can use a manually operated bike pump or a small electric plug in pump.
 

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What do you guy's like about the the larger tire size? What handling characteristics do you feel are due to the tire size increase vs just having a better tire and tread design? I ask because I too would like to upgrade my tires eventually and I agree that there are far better tires out there and wondering if anything is contributed to the increase in size?
 

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Ground clearance would be the biggest reason for bigger tires.
Higher center of gravity would be the biggest reason against bigger tires.
If you use wheel spacers then you can negate some of the rise in center of gravity.
 

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Bigger tires are not only for more ground clearance but for over all ride quality. When you upgrade from the crappy stock 2 plys to more durable 6 ply tires, a 25" tire will ride rougher then a 26" or a 27"

Another advantage of larger tires is the extra protection from damaging your wheels or pinching a tire side wall. Seen that a few times!
 

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I didn't realize it affected the ride quality too.
Thanks for the advice.
Simular effect to when running 14" wheels. Sure they look better then 12" and will handle better on smooth terrains but your tires are part of your suspension. (this is why tire pressure is important btw!) With 14" wheels you ve removed alot of tire thus the ride quality suffers.
 
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