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Discussion Starter #1
2018 kodiak 700 EPS SE . KFI se25 winch. AIS deleted. Bout to order a fuel programmer.
 

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Welcome!

What is an AIS delete? Air Induction System delete?

What effect does an AIS delete have on the machine?

I sure would like to find a fuel programmer that can program and unplug and not require permanent placement.

Thanks,

Bryan
 

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If I can ask some naive questions, what does this do to improve the machine? What does it cost? How hard is it to install? Why does the factory not put it on?
 

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The best removable one (fuel/timing) that I've found for a streetbike was a Maximus, very expensive, but I don't think they make them for quads.

These units can be tuned over the internet where you take out the bike and do certain requested moves, and then download the info to guys that can tweak the tuning.

A few times of this and you are very close to an actual dyno tune, and they can handle cams superchargers, turbos, or NOS.



The next best (fuel/timing) is a piggyback unit called a Power Commander V (PCV) mid priced.
It also is fully tunable using a dyno other than not being able to effect ignition timing below 2500 rpm and not being removable, and they can handle cams superchargers, turbos, or NOS.
I have one of those and it has been excellent from the get go, but the shop I bought it from loaded the tune that came from a really good dyno tune session.

I still plan on doing a dyno tune for that last 5% or so...just have to find a guy good enough that isn't too far from home. When I had my street bike tuned I rode 2K miles to a guy in Iowa.

He is the king from the Midwest to the west for the brand of street bike I have.



The next kind are the ones most guys run for basic setups.

They come with canned tunes in them, and you select the buttons on the unit to tune it close enough for most.

These are piggy back units also and must remain on the bike.


The reason the factory doesn't tune the bikes properly is because of EPA requirements for new bikes to be sold.
The EPA doesn't care if your bike engine is being cooked by very lean conditions, but you can fix the situation by adding more fuel and sometimes ignition timing within certain rpm ranges with an advanced fuel/timing tuner. Ignition timing is the tricky stuff and is safest done by a Dyno Guru IMO.
 

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Primethious, thanks for all the info, I will be watching to see what I can learn and looking for recommendations on a good one.
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
The AIS , air injection system emissions. RIGht next to the exhaust port you’ll see a rubber 9/16” hose that runs up to a valve then to the fwd left side of your airbox. I removed both ends and put rubber caps and hose clamps on the nipples then plugged the hose on both ends and tucked away Incase for some reason I need into later on. It’s not a huge power gain prob non at all but at least I can avoid some popping on decelerations.

********I had it backwards, the AIS dumps clean air from the box to the exhaust port for unburnt fuel and causes popping on decelerations *******

As for the programmer I’m still doing research as to which one I want. Which one I can use if I want to do more upgrades to the engine later down the line. IM looking into the EHS one right now.
 

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The AIS , air injection system , recycles exhaust gases back into the air box for a second burn for cleaner emissions .
I'll admit, I have very limited experience with these systems. But I don't believe this statement is correct.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
What do you believe then with limited experience ?
 

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What do you believe then with limited experience ?
My limited experience is the fact that I've never owned an atv with AIS system. But I had an idea how they worked.

Anyways you corrected the information and you in fact explained the function of the system very well.
 

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I'm not sure what to think about all this....I have two 2016 700's, other than having to start them twice when cold, they both run fast, hard, and perform reliably. I don't get what the problem is that people are trying to fix by reprogramming the fuel mixture controls. Is it better acceleration? better mileage? or what? I think my quads are super fast and get good mileage now.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I'm not sure what to think about all this....I have two 2016 700's, other than having to start them twice when cold, they both run fast, hard, and perform reliably. I don't get what the problem is that people are trying to fix by reprogramming the fuel mixture controls. Is it better acceleration? better mileage? or what? I think my quads are super fast and get good mileage now.

Maybe the 2016 are diff but what I got from friends that have grizzlys 700 theyre the same. These machines have been leaned out a lot for emissions therefore making them run on the hotter side. I noticed my machines cooling fans running all the time trying to cool it down. Adding the fuel programmer will enrichen the mixture cooling the temp of the engine down and gaining some performance.
 

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Maybe the 2016 are diff but what I got from friends that have grizzlys 700 theyre the same. These machines have been leaned out a lot for emissions therefore making them run on the hotter side. I noticed my machines cooling fans running all the time trying to cool it down. Adding the fuel programmer will enrichen the mixture cooling the temp of the engine down and gaining some performance.
Hmmm....Neither of our quads cooling fans come on until we've been really horsing around for a long time, OR until I've been plowing for a long time. Both machines get hot, but all machines get hot when running. There is definitely more heat near the exhaust, but again that seems normal to me, my old enduro's got plenty hot back in the day. If adjusting the fuel mixture somehow increased machine life or reduced maintenance/repair frequency then I would like to learn more about this.
 

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The ideal air to fuel ratio is called a stoichiometric ratio where as you get a perfect burn...at least in theory.
Everyone sets there ratio lower than that though.
The higher the number the leaner the conditions, and the lower the number the richer the conditions
Setting a steady cruise will have a higher ratio for fuel economy than say at full throttle where the ratio should drop down a bit to add power and keep temps down. When adding or taking away timing you may need to adjust the fuel as well.

The ratio can need to be changed as the throttle is being twisted so they set up the ratios for each situation. In the end you have a very smooth throttle that reacts quickly and a bike that runs seamlessly throughout its range.

I added a bunch of thermal insulation under my plastics to keep the temp down even more.
 

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Primethious you seem to be on board with this concept? My 18 700 does seem to have the fan running a bunch, even when I am operating at low RPM and 30 degree weather. I know that there is little natural air flow through the radiator at low speeds.
 

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Primethious you seem to be on board with this concept? My 18 700 does seem to have the fan running a bunch, even when I am operating at low RPM and 30 degree weather. I know that there is little natural air flow through the radiator at low speeds.
To really know just how lean you tune is you'd need to put it on an 02 sniffer such as a dyno.

The fan will run less often if the bike has a better tune, but it will still run if you not moving around much.
 
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