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So I just had my Kodiak 700 EPS in for its first service at 10 hours. I asked the service technician if they used synthetic oil in the engine and transmission, where I quickly got the standard 'we recommend Yamaha...' so I never really got an honest answer.

I'm planning to switch everything over to Amsoil products once the warranty runs out. Just wondering what other people are doing for lubrication... standard Yamaha? Synthetic? or something different?
 

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I had my first service done a few months ago, and they used the Yamalube. Seems fine to me. Hasn't burned a drop. I'll probably stick with it since I plan on changing the oil more often than needed. Lots of folks say to complete your break in thoroughly before switching to synthetic. I also had them change the diff. fluids also.
 

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Right now I am using Valvoline 10w40 conventional oil for the engine and Valvoline 75w90 Synthetic for both the front end rear ends.

On the rear end you need to make sure that the oil is GL-4 rated which most synthetics are. It has the friction modifiers in the oil for the wet brake that it needs.

What ever oil you use make sure that it meets Yamaha's specifications which can be found in the owners manual. I also plan on doing yearly changes on all the oils.
 
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Speaking of changing the oil, the dealer recommended changing the oil every 50 hours, what are you doing?
 

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I'll run the oil for a year and then change it. That is the way that I did it on my other ATV's and I really don't see a need to change.

If you really want to know just when to change the oil you need to get it analyzed to see what the additives in it are doing.

I have been using Blackstone Labs for my diesel truck and a gas Explorer. I might send them a oil sample next year when I change it on my Kodiak.

https://www.blackstone-labs.com/
 

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I use Amsoil on my street bike, but on the Kodiak I'm using Yamaha oils and greases.
The rear axle gets dirty very fast with the brake inside the oil so I plan on changing it twice as often as the front diff.
The primary sheave needs two separate greases(light and dark), and the secondary sheave only needs the dark one.
 

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I use Amsoil on my street bike, but on the Kodiak I'm using Yamaha oils and greases.
The rear axle gets dirty very fast with the brake inside the oil so I plan on changing it twice as often as the front diff.
The primary sheave needs two separate greases(light and dark), and the secondary sheave only needs the dark one.
That makes my brain hurt just thinking about it! Think I'll stick with the Yamaha lubes for now since both wheelers are still in the break in period. Dealer changed engine and diffs at first service (10 hours), then recommended engine only at 50 hours, and engine and diffs at 100 hours. Does that match pretty close to what you're doing?
 

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I did the first change at about 80 miles. I'm just over 100 now so it will be a little while...probably when I hit 200 for the next one.
I didn't see grease fittings the the first time so I need to go under there and see if I can give them a shot of grease.
 

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I did the first change at about 80 miles. I'm just over 100 now so it will be a little while...probably when I hit 200 for the next one.
I didn't see grease fittings the the first time so I need to go under there and see if I can give them a shot of grease.
there's four fittings in the rear. I had to replace with 45 degree zerks because I was unable to get a grease gun to attached otherwise. That was my experience anyways.
 

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Just to make sure on the grease fittings they are metric 6mmx1 and not SAE 1/4x20 correct?

I know the all the other bolts on the machine are metric but you just never know.
 

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New atv owner

I use Amsoil on my street bike, but on the Kodiak I'm using Yamaha oils and greases.
The rear axle gets dirty very fast with the brake inside the oil so I plan on changing it twice as often as the front diff.
The primary sheave needs two separate greases(light and dark), and the secondary sheave only needs the dark one.
I am a new owner of a lightly used 2016 Yamaha Kodiak 700 EPS SE and have never owned or operated an ATV before. We purchased this atv to use on the farm, move electric fencing and feed big round bales of hay using the hitch and a two wheel cart to lift the round bale, transport it and unroll it.

What and where are the "primary sheave needs two separate greases(light and dark), and the secondary sheave only needs the dark one"?

Can anyone direct me to videos on how to service the machine, remove panels, oil change, battery and power steering, front and rear axles, etc?

Thank you and happy trails, Mike Foate

2016 Yamaha Kodiak 700 EPS SE, 67 hrs, 700 miles.
 

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I don't know of any videos but servicing the Kodiak is fairly straight forward.

If you plan on doing it your self I suggest that you pull the skid plates off to keep from making a mess. Start with the front one and end with the back. Pay attention to the bolts that come out of the front since there are two different shoulders with one being a bit shorter than the other.

The rear requires a oil with a friction modifier in it for the wet clutches and should be rated GL4. Yamaha has one with their name on it if you want to keep all the fluids factory. The rear has 2 drain plugs, one to drain all the oil out of it and the other to get around 3/4 of it out. The one towards the front of the rear diff is the one to drain all the fluid. Also the rear has a fill plug and a level check plug. The check plug is on the right side of the diff with the fill plug being on the rear of it. Just fill until it comes out of the check plug.

The front diff just has a single drain plug and fill plug, just fill it until fluid flows out of the fill hole. You can use the same fluid that you put into the rear end or a 75w90 fluid like I did.

A engine oil change is just as simple. Drain plug on the bottom of the engine and you fill it through the dipstick hole. Get yourself a filter with a long tube to do this to keep from making a mess of things as you try to put oil back into it. The filter is on the front of the engine just above the skid plate. I used a Wix filter while others use the factory Yamaha one.

There are also 4 grease zirts on the rear A arms. You can see it them when looking at the A arms from the rear, they are towards the wheels.

The air filter is a oiled foam filter. I believe that the owners manual explains how to service it. Some have gone with a aftermarket one feeling that it seals up better than the factory one.


If you are really serious about doing the work on the Kodiak I suggest that you pick up a repair manual. I got a CD off of Ebay for around $14 that covers all the above and a lot more.
 

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JimP, thank you so much. That was very kind of you and helpful. I will print this info and save it.

Do you know of any particular issues I might watch for with the machine?

I am interested in the potential air filter fitment issue.

We (my wife and I) are 60 years old so we wont be beating the crap out of the machine. We were hoping this to be our first and last machine at our age. ;-) And we want to take good care of it. I will be doing most of the service myself.

Thank you kindly sir.
 

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I believe that if you take care of it the Kodiak will last a good long time. My last one was 17 years old when I sold it.

I haven't heard of any real issues other than excessive heat on the drivers side of the Kodiak. And if you ride with your wife on the back she will notice the heat on the drivers side fender where her left leg will sit. I ordered some reflective tape off of Amazon and it seams to of done a good job of keeping things cooler. I'll know next month when I have a rider for a while. There are also vents on the drivers side right next to the riders left leg and I have found a lot of heat coming out of them when you are riding slow but seams to go away once you speed things up just a little.

Here is the post I made about putting the tape on.

https://www.kodiakowners.com/forum/538-what-did-you-do-your-kodiak-700-today/7730-reflective-heat-tape-fender.html

On the air filter I haven't noticed a problem yet but some who ride in dusty conditions say that the fit isn't what it should be.
 
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I am a new owner of a lightly used 2016 Yamaha Kodiak 700 EPS SE and have never owned or operated an ATV before. We purchased this atv to use on the farm, move electric fencing and feed big round bales of hay using the hitch and a two wheel cart to lift the round bale, transport it and unroll it.

What and where are the "primary sheave needs two separate greases(light and dark), and the secondary sheave only needs the dark one"?

Can anyone direct me to videos on how to service the machine, remove panels, oil change, battery and power steering, front and rear axles, etc?

Thank you and happy trails, Mike Foate

2016 Yamaha Kodiak 700 EPS SE, 67 hrs, 700 miles.
James produced a video about five years ago that only used Ultramatic, but later found out this combo worked better. He does this stuff for a living and rides more than most guys ever will. I've never met him in person, but he's always been helpful when I called.

When I pulled mine apart the two greases were used with great success.
Basically the shafts get the dark because it stays put, and the weights get the light grease that's flung outward.

Here is his updated video from 3 years ago.
 
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