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I owned a 2015 Grizzly 700 EPS for 2 years. The machine is a beast. The power is sporty, the suspension is comfortable on rough terrain, the steering is smooth. I swapped out the 26 inch stock tires immediately with 25 inch heavier ply tires too improve stability because the center of gravity was too high (I live in a mountainous region in Alaska). I have 30 years of ATV riding experience that prepared me to safely operate and enjoy the machine's performance. In many ways, however, the Grizzly 700 is not a sensible ATV, especially for a beginner rider, most especially in unforgiving terrain. A novice will probably hurt themself before they "grow into it." On too many excursions I witnessed less experienced riders with Grizzly's flip backwards while applying too much throttle climbing over obstacles, roll down steep trails, and/or crash in deep ruts.
I recently purchased a 2019 Kodiak 700 EPS and could not be happier. Although the performance of the Grizzly can be intoxicating at times, the Kodiak is a much more reasonable and manageable machine. It is better suited for all day trail riding and utility. There is plenty of power, the lower stance adds to stability, the handlebars and seating position are comfortable. The Kodiak now has the same push button 4x4/locking differential handlebar set up as the Grizzly. With the price difference, the Kodiak 700 is the 'sweet spot' in the Yamaha line up. Hope this helps :)
 

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Welcome to the Kodiak Forum.
 

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I had absolutly no problem going way too fast through some techical trails yesterday on the kodiak.

I feel the acceleration is more than necessary. Lol

Welcome to the forums!
 

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That is an interesting evaluation and helpful. I am going to upset a few with a comment that I have, that I was reminded of when I read it. I think that the Kodiak needs some ballast up front when climbing steep hills, especially when there is a load on the back rack. Does anyone agree with me?
 

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All wheelers need ballast on the front when climbing steep hills or even climbing over rocks.

A friend has 100 lbs of lead bolted to his front rack for going up hills. I once asked him how he went down those hills with the extra weight now on the downhill side?

Sent from my SM-J737V using Tapatalk
 

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I love having the rear sealed wet brake it’s one of the main reasons I bought the kodiak. We bought ours last early spring and after 1 season of trail and heavy mud hole use my brake pads were paper thin. It was nice only having to change out the front’s where’s on our older 400&450 kodiaks that our boys ride I had to do fronts and rears.
 

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Interesting to hear JimP. I would recommend a system that allows a person to shift it to the back. The lower the weight is to the ground would be better. I had a friend flip one backward, going up a trail that he used for years. There was a 5 inch branch that had fallen across the trail and he thought he could drive over it, and then got up against it, it stopped him, so he made the mistake of accelerating over it, that flipped him over, he was not hurt, and it was not a Kodiak. It did do extensive damage.
 

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When I first started riding ATV's we would hang over the handle bars when going up hills.

One year I was on a 3 wheeler with a deer strapped to the small front rack on the front tire fender. I started up a hill and the bike came over backwards. I put the deer back on and tried it again, yep, I flipped it over backwards again. The third time I walked the bike up the hill with the deer on the rack. I have also done the same thing with my old 89 Big Bear 350 but with a elk. I started up a hill covered in sagebrush and realized that it was going to come over. I got off and walked the bike up the hill with 1/2 a elk on the front rack.

When it comes down to it a lot is riding techniques and knowing what to do and what not to do. The big thing is that if you get stopped on a hill that is fairly steep do not give it more power than to get the bike moving and if there is something in the way either move it, go around it, or turn around.
 

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Lots of great advice and wisdom! These machines are much heavier than they were 30 years ago.
 

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When I first started riding ATV's we would hang over the handle bars when going up hills.

One year I was on a 3 wheeler with a deer strapped to the small front rack on the front tire fender. I started up a hill and the bike came over backwards. I put the deer back on and tried it again, yep, I flipped it over backwards again. The third time I walked the bike up the hill with the deer on the rack. I have also done the same thing with my old 89 Big Bear 350 but with a elk. I started up a hill covered in sagebrush and realized that it was going to come over. I got off and walked the bike up the hill with 1/2 a elk on the front rack.

When it comes down to it a lot is riding techniques and knowing what to do and what not to do. The big thing is that if you get stopped on a hill that is fairly steep do not give it more power than to get the bike moving and if there is something in the way either move it, go around it, or turn around.



Hey, Jim. Novice rider here, with roughly 300 miles "under my belt" My first riding adventure was on Majestic Trails in northern PA. Quite a few hill climbs through those trails and my Kodiak did great. I would put it in 4WD on occasion for a little added grip, and always "felt" for any sort of front end lift. The majority of the time I was in a bit of a stance, slightly raised over the seat, and when necessary I would lean over towards the front of the machine to help hold the front end down.



Strictly out of curiosity, you mentioned when you first started riding you'd lean over the handle bars. Do you no longer do that, and why?
 

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A lot of how you ride comes from experience on what you need to do. You will find that these machines will go up some scary stuff with you just sitting on the seat with your rear in front of the Kodiak's rear end. I have a hill that I will ride up down in Arizona that if I stand up the rear end will start to spin some on the loose dirt. If I stay seated I'll go right up it with no tire spin.

When I first started to ride ATV's I had no real idea of what they were capable of doing, but experience helps a lot. I have also found that I will kick it into 4x4 mode way before I even need it. It is a lot better than getting into a situation that you need it and are going to start to have problems engaging it or even stopping and then having to get going again.
 
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We were looking for a new quad for me and I wanted one with 4x4. After researching the different models online, I had chosen the yamaha Kodiak 450. When we went into the dealership, I saw the Grizzly and Kodiak 700 and gave them a closer look. The Grizzly was not as comfortable for me as the Kodiak. What made me choose the 700 over the 450 was the diff lock, skid plates, rear rack capacity and additional power. The point that won over the wife was the incentive at the time of the dealer installed winch at no extra cost.

I find the rear sealed brake works very well ands its predictable response is greatly appreciated. The lack of clearnce compared to the Grizzly is more than offset for me by the lower center of gravity. I ride steep and off camber terrain a lot.

I like the smooth application of power as well. I am not out win races and know that the Kodiak has been easy to use for chores on the property. I have no doubt that the Grizzly is a GREAT machine, but for me I am confident the Kodiak was the right choice for what I use a quad for.

I also let others ride the 700 from time to time and would be much more reluctant to do so with a Grizzly, fearing that they may flip it or therwise lose control of it and hurt themselves. Even my wife who is mostly inexperienced and reluctant in her riding style appreciated and enjoyed piloting the Kodiak. Hers is a Kawasaki Brute Force 300. It is 2wd and has a solid axle rear swingarm. It has been a great reliable machine, but after trying out the Kodiak, the wife will probably choose the "Cadillac" Kodiak when we go out riding together.

I know this is an older thread and that you have probably already made your decision, but thought I would share my 2 cents worth.

Happy trails!

: )B
 
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