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Hey guys, new here. Born and bred Honda guy, looking at trying something different. I’ve narrowed down to a 2017+ Kodiak 700 EPS or a Honda Foreman. Anyone come from the newer Honda’s and glad you changed? Will be used 80% work (food plots-till/drag) and small trailers. 20% fun. What makes the Kodiak 700 better than the Honda?
 

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More power, much smoother ride, definitely starts easier than the new honda (that one, I was surprised). More ground clearance on the kodiak. Yamaha engine braking is second to none
Both are very dependable bikes. The Honda will be easier on fuel. You can't go wrong really on either, but when I was comparing, I got my 700 kodiak a few hundred cheaper than the 500 honda.
I grew up on Hondas, so I was going into buying new with Honda foreman 500 or a rubicon 500 on my mind. Then I got researching yamaha, that's what we used at my last job in mining exploration, age they were tough. After researching, I was leaning hard towards a 450 kodiak, only I didn't really want a 450, that start the Honda Forman was that I had them... Kinda wanted to go with a bit bigger. That's when I realized the 700 kodiak was in my price range, a bit more research and a visit to the dealership.... Sold! I love my 2018 yamaha kodiak 700 se

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Thanks! That’s pretty much the same spot I’m in! I have heard that some people deal with overheating issues with the Kodiaks when being worked hard. Have you dealt with this?
 

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I've never heard of overheating issues with the Kodiak. I took a new rubicon out for a test about a year ago and consider it a step down from the Kodak in both power and comfort.
 

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The Kodiak's feel like they are overheating due to the hotter exhaust.

I have worked mine quite hard and I have a aftermarket set of gauges and the hottest that the coolant has ever gotten is 209 F, usually it stays between 194-206F
 

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That makes sense and glad to hear! Kodiak is really what I’m leaning toward. Is why I posted here to get some real world reviews!
 

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I will never have a machine the quality of my 91 Honda Fourtrax, that I still have. Having said that I would not ever want to lose my 700 Kodiak, this transmission is the big reason I went for the Kodiak. Good luck with your choice!
 

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There's so many people that are misinformed about how the Yamaha cooling system works. They seem to think the machine is overheating because the fans come on often, but if you read in the manual it states the cooling fans will come on when the engine reaches operating temperature. The fans come on to prevent overheating not because of overheating.

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I also have a Honda Rubicon and my 700 Kodiak is a way better machine in every area.
 

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the biggest difference between the two are the mechanics...the honda foreman is a manual clutch whereas the kodiack is auto (not sure if the foreman comes in an auto model?) ..also, the foreman has a single swingarm rear shock compared to the kodiacks IRS (independent rear suspension) --again, not sure if the foreman has a model with that option and if it does have a model with those options how much more of a price tag is it?? basically, the kodiack you described (EPS model with IRS shocks) with be light years more comfortable than a stock foreman w/o EPS and a single rear shockj
 

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the biggest difference between the two are the mechanics...the honda foreman is a manual clutch whereas the kodiack is auto (not sure if the foreman comes in an auto model?) ..also, the foreman has a single swingarm rear shock compared to the kodiacks IRS (independent rear suspension) --again, not sure if the foreman has a model with that option and if it does have a model with those options how much more of a price tag is it?? basically, the kodiack you described (EPS model with IRS shocks) with be light years more comfortable than a stock foreman w/o EPS and a single rear shockj
The Forman doesn't have a manual clutch, it's a 5 speed manual transmission with automatic clutch. If you step up to t by e eps model, you can get the fully automatic transmission or the manual 5 speed.

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I have a Pair of Rancher 420’s and upgraded to a Kodiak 700se last year. I still use my 420 straight axle for work duty as I prefer the straight axle for that stuff. I honestly haven’t put the Kodiak “to work” yet though besides dragging a 12’ boat to some backwoods fishing holes. For trail and play, Kodiak by far and it rides better than my Rancher AT/IRS and that one will probably be upgraded to a Kodiak 700 down the road.
 

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We have a 2016 Kodiak 700 eps. It is strictly a work machine on the ranch. Primary job is feeding cows. We have a 2 wheel bale cart we back up to big round bales weighing up to 1400 lbs. Hoist them up on the cart and transport them to the cows. The cart with bale attached is balanced such that there is very little if any weight on the hitch. We either set the bales on the ground and unroll them by pulling the cart with the bale attached or just set them down, unhook them from the cart and bale graze them. This machine has worked very well for us.

The power steering is invaluable as well has having the ability to put it in park. We we're leaning towards the big Honda because I thought it had a drive shaft as opposed to the Kodiaks belt drive. The belt drive has not been an issue. We like not having to shift through a bunch of gears.

The machine gives off quite a bit of heat around the legs and thighs in the summer however, the heat is appreciated in the winter. 😁

Hope that helps.
 

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We have a 2016 Kodiak 700 eps. It is strictly a work machine on the ranch. Primary job is feeding cows. We have a 2 wheel bale cart we back up to big round bales weighing up to 1400 lbs. Hoist them up on the cart and transport them to the cows. The cart with bale attached is balanced such that there is very little if any weight on the hitch. We either set the bales on the ground and unroll them by pulling the cart with the bale attached or just set them down, unhook them from the cart and bale graze them. This machine has worked very well for us.

The power steering is invaluable as well has having the ability to put it in park. We we're leaning towards the big Honda because I thought it had a drive shaft as opposed to the Kodiaks belt drive. The belt drive has not been an issue. We like not having to shift through a bunch of gears.

The machine gives off quite a bit of heat around the legs and thighs in the summer however, the heat is appreciated in the winter. 😁

Hope that helps.
Both Honda and Yamaha utilize shaft drive in their bikes for the Utility models..

The difference is Honda utilize an a 5 speed manual with auto clutch or the fancy dual clutch auto transmission.


Where the Yamaha utilize their bullet proof and super simple ultramatic style constent belt tension CVT with a wet clutch transmissions.
 
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