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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I had my new Kodiak 450 on the trail this weekend. While out on the trail I dropped into a water hole that was deeper than I had anticipated and sunk the machine up to top of the tires. I was able to get out of the hole without killing the machine but shortly afterwards I lost the ability to move forward or backwards. With some help, we tipped the machine on end to drain the water and pulled the v-belt case plug to drain the case, let it dry for a bit and limped it back home. It's now a day later and I'm still not able to drive over 15 mph without the motor revving like it's stuck in low gear. Any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. :frown2:
 

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Can you tell if the belt is slipping or is it the clutch just not engaging completely?
 

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Your going to need to pull the CVT cover and do an inspection of your belt and sheaves.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Can you tell if the belt is slipping or is it the clutch just not engaging completely?
It doesn't feel like the chug of a belt slip. I'm getting the high rev of it not shifting gears.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Your going to need to pull the CVT cover and do an inspection of your belt and sheaves.
What should I be looking for?
 

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Look for contamination or debris on the belt and sheaves. From a stand still the belt should be way down on the primary sheave and be sitting high on the secondary sheave . The sheave and belt need to be clean to operate properly.
With the CVT cover off you can Rev the bike in neutral and observe the CVT shifting threw out its ratio changes. I strongly suggest you keep the supportive cage properly secured over the primary sheave when doing this test.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Look for contamination or debris on the belt and sheaves. From a stand still the belt should be way down on the primary sheave and be sitting high on the secondary sheave . The sheave and belt need to be clean to operate properly.
With the CVT cover off you can Rev the bike in neutral and observe the CVT shifting threw out its ratio changes. I strongly suggest you keep the supportive cage properly secured over the primary sheave when doing this test.
Since my machine is still under warranty, would I be better off letting the dealer deal with the issue? Or is this a pretty common issue when you get into deeper water?
 

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Since my machine is still under warranty, would I be better off letting the dealer deal with the issue? Or is this a pretty common issue when you get into deeper water?
Never swamped my CVT but have seen others do it. They simply drain it and drove on without issues like your describing. (Even without issues a CVT that has been flooded should be serviced)

I've also never owned a new machine, much less ever had a warranty so I can't comment on what is best for you.
 

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Since my machine is still under warranty, would I be better off letting the dealer deal with the issue? Or is this a pretty common issue when you get into deeper water?
You can try to have them cover it but don't expect them to pay for it. Warranty usually doesn't include self inflected problems.
 

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Sounds like things are clogged up with sand and mud.
Pull the sheave off and completely clean it out and clean the belt with warm soapy water and replace if req'd, and then re-grease the sheave and weights with both proper Yamaha greases (don't skimp on this!), and do the same thing to the secondary side as well, but with the secondary you'll only use the black stuff.

Use red locktite on the two main nuts.
Having air and a $10 tiny torque wrench from Harbor Freight will help.
 

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Sounds like things are clogged up with sand and mud.
Pull the sheave off and completely clean it out and clean the belt with warm soapy water and replace if req'd, and then re-grease the sheave and weights with both proper Yamaha greases (don't skimp on this!), and do the same thing to the secondary side as well, but with the secondary you'll only use the black stuff.

Use red locktite on the two main nuts.
Having air and a $10 tiny torque wrench from Harbor Freight will help.
All excellent advice. But red locktight is never required . With a proper nut torquing, no locktight is needed. Blue locktight is more then enough for someone looking for the extra insurance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
UPDATE - I brought the Kodiak 450 to the dealer for first service and diagnostics on the shifting. As it turns out, the primary clutch was packed with dried mud and dirt, essentially turning it into concrete and preventing the clutch from operating correctly. Fortunately there was no damage to the clutch or belt (got lucky there). The dealer cleaned, adjusted and lubricated everything for $90. Not a warranty item but not terribly expensive to fix. Moving forward, they suggested a dry high-speed run after mudding to fully engage the clutch and force the mud out.
 
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Glad that they got it figured out quickly and at a reasonable price.

It is a lesson for all of us.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The mechanic noted that he had never seen a clutch so packed with mud on a machine that only had 9 hours on it. I'm glad I could be a good example of what not to do with your brand new wheeler ;)

In my defense, I didn't buy it so it could look pretty in the garage.
 
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