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Discussion Starter #22
Well, you've touched on several key points here, and frankly, I don't even know where to begin! I guess I'll start by saying that I shopped for this Kodiak 700 EPS (fall tan with realtree camo trim), daily, across the entire western U.S., literally for MONTHS, and every time I found one, it was either spoken for (a pre-order), or it had sold in a matter of hours after dropping at the dealer. I talked with a dealer here in western Montana one day in early January, and he said that he had just sold one, exactly what I was after, just 12-days earlier, to a guy who drove up from Missouri to get it! Fact!

As a licensed dealer, he had access to an on-line dealer inventory database, so he looked at it for me and identified only three units shown as "available" in the west (one each in Utah, Idaho and Washington), and when I called, all three were either green or orange (which I didn't want), and all three had already been sold. Then, on January 16th, I spoke with a dealer in Colorado, who said . . . "give me your number and if something drops, I'll call you." On February 8th, he phoned, and said that he had just received one. I gave him a deposit on the spot, and drove 900 miles to get it the very next day, in -14 to -22 degrees F temps. All-in-all, it took 5-days, roundtrip. Blizzards, high winds, white-outs, fog, black ice, you name it! And why? Why would I do something so foolish?

Simple. Every single dealer that I spoke with in the weeks leading up to travel, had horror stories about ordering one. Three reputable, large volume dealers here in the west told me that they had multiple buyers (mostly ranchers and the like), who had pre-ordered 2021 and/or 2022 Kodiaks and Grizzlies, and yet, despite having posted sizeable deposits, they were told by their dealers as much as 4-months later, that Yamaha (in Atlanta or wherever?), had abruptly cancelled their pending order, without notice, and without apologies. And THAT, is why I chose to make the ridiculous 2,000 mile trip.

Now, regarding issues with cold starting . . . my 700 EPS is most definitely problematic, and I'll have more to say about that later, but in the last 2-3 days of on-line research, I have encountered literally dozens upon dozens of other Kodiak owners (2016-2021), many from frigid places like Alaska, Toronto, Edmonton or Norway, etc., who have (and are) experiencing the very same thing (i.e., extreme cold with 5-8 cycles of the starter, without the machine starting properly). So yes, in my view, there is most definitely a problem. What is the cause or solution? I'm not quite sure yet. I'm busy researching battery specs (270 cc amps OEM vs. 310 cc amps aftermarket, etc.), but my gut tells me that the problem lies more in the EFI (electronic fuel injection) system, and the ridiculously lean factory fuel/air mixture (too little fuel). At some point, I envision myself upgrading to a higher (310 cold crank amp) battery, but I firmly believe that it will take an aftermarket (e.g., EHS) tuner module to vastly improve fuel management, and possibly even some intake/exhaust changes to get it truly "right".

Anyway, in closing, this rather lengthy response became a bit verbose, so my apologies there, but I hope it helps you and others here, in your future decisions.

Cheers!
 

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My 2017 doesn't mind the cold but my 2020 seems to want you to take it inside if it gets much below 55*.

Steve........
 

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Discussion Starter #24
My 2017 doesn't mind the cold but my 2020 seems to want you to take it inside if it gets much below 55*.

Steve........
Interesting! I don't know enough about these things and their specifications yet, but are both of your units fuel injected? I ask this because your 2020 and my 2021 are both fuel injected, and the one stand-out thing I've noticed with mine is that it doesn't seem to choke or throttle-up upon initial start-up, the way an older carbureted motor would. It sputters and stays at low idle, regardless of how cold it is, then stalls, and that strikes me as a bit odd, when most fuel injected cars and trucks usually DO rev-up in that way.
 

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Interesting! I don't know enough about these things and their specifications yet, but are both of your units fuel injected? I ask this because your 2020 and my 2021 are both fuel injected, and the one stand-out thing I've noticed with mine is that it doesn't seem to choke or throttle-up upon initial start-up, the way an older carbureted motor would. It sputters and stays at low idle, regardless of how cold it is, then stalls, and that strikes me as a bit odd, when most fuel injected cars and trucks usually DO rev-up in that way.
686cc engine has been fuel injected since it's introduction in 2007
 

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Discussion Starter #27
Thanks guys, and yeah, that's kinda what I thought. EFI has been around a long time, so I suspected the 2017 would be fuel injected as well. But it leaves me/us with the question, why would the 2017 and 2020 models behave so differently in the cold? I don't think EPA regulations have changed any for a decade or more, so that's a real puzzle.
 

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Completely different engines, 2016-2018 is a Subaru contracted 708cc DOHC and for 2019+, it is back to a Yamaha 686cc SOHC.
 

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We have at least two of the old 1570 Case tractors and both of them crank differently, one takes a bit to crank it with ether when it is very cold but the other one will crank in half the time without either. They have been that way since new.

Steve.......
 

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My 19', new out of the box, took 2-3 attempts to get it to stay running. After about 10 hours of use it usually stays running the 1st try, 2nd try if it's below freezing. These engines are pretty tight when new and need some hours on them to loosen up.
 

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Discussion Starter #31 (Edited)
My 19', new out of the box, took 2-3 attempts to get it to stay running. After about 10 hours of use it usually stays running the 1st try, 2nd try if it's below freezing. These engines are pretty tight when new and need some hours on them to loosen up.
Thanks BlueIron, and yes, I think you and others here are exactly right in this instance. Our local temps have gone up substantially here over the past few days (almost 30-degree daytime high), and while still awfully stubborn to get started, it's definitely running a bit better, once it has warmed up. Lots of sputtering at idle and backfiring upon deceleration, even when fully warm (which remains a bit troubling), but I think as the days go by and regular use continues, with the motor slowly breaking in, it may well get better. So thanks for your feedback in that regard.

I also noticed late Sunday, that despite there being no low voltage indicator on the dashboard, the battery was well below 12-volts, and required an inordinate amount of time to trickle charge back to full charge at 1.25 amp (almost 30 hours!!). Fortunately, it's now reading almost 13-volts and cycles much stronger, so that's a positive development as well. I've since read the owners manual and learned that the low voltage indicator won't actually trip until it's below 10-volts, and this one had to be awfully near that, but it's now reading a comfy 13.4-volts. (y)

Anyway, I say . . . "bring-on spring"! So that I can get a true feel for things, and decide whether or not an aftermarket tuner will eventually be required to reduce some of these other annoying anomalies.
 

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Thanks BlueIron, and yes, I think you and others here are exactly right in this instance. Our local temps have gone up substantially here over the past few days (almost 30-degree daytime high), and while still awfully stubborn to get started, it's definitely running a bit better, once it has warmed up. Lots of sputtering at idle and backfiring upon deceleration, even when fully warm (which remains a bit troubling), but I think as the days go by and regular use continues, with the motor slowly breaking in, it may well get better. So thanks for your feedback in that regard.

I also noticed late Sunday, that despite there being no low voltage indicator on the dashboard, the battery was well below 12-volts, and required an inordinate amount of time to trickle charge back to full charge at 1.25 amp (almost 30 hours!!). Fortunately, it's now reading almost 13-volts and cycles much stronger, so that's a positive development as well. I've since read the owners manual and learned that the low voltage indicator won't actually trip until it's below 10-volts, and this one had to be awfully near that, but it's now reading a comfy 13.4-volts. (y)

Anyway, I say . . . "bring-on spring"! So that I can get a true feel for things, and decide whether or not an aftermarket tuner will eventually be required to reduce some of these other annoying anomalies.
Hi,

I just saw your post and went out and tried it started right up and stayed running but it turned over noticeably slower than last month when i rode it at 40 degrees. I run standard Castro oil in it.

I have a 2017 700 Kodiak se with 500miles on it, I always keep on a battery tender and I am going on a sweet snow ride tonight. Its snowing again and is15(F) degrees now 6:45pm.
 

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Discussion Starter #33
Good deal! A good quality 5w-30 is what I'll be putting into mine soon, and we're sitting at a balmy 29 degrees here right now, headed for 40+ by next Monday. So that'll help alot too. Yee-haw!
 

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Greetings All,

I'm new to the Kodiak 700 Forum, but I just purchased a new 2021 Kodiak 700 EPS, and I'm curious to see if others have any trouble routinely starting there Kodiaks?

I'll start by saying that I live in relatively cold country (really cold in recent days!), and I'm hoping that's at the heart of my problem, but even at the dealership, which was located in a considerably warmer climate, this particular Kodiak seemed a bit finnicky when it came to starting and idling. For example, it took the salesman five to six cycles before it would eventually start and idle, and when it finally did, it seemed a bit rough at idle, with the odor of a somewhat rich fuel mixture.

Given these circumstances, what do some of you other Kodiak owners feel? Should I be concerned about it? Are the Yamaha (Grizzly/Kodiak models), generally problematic in this regard, even in warmer climates? Is it likely to be related to the fuel injection system? Basically, do you think I might have an issue with this particular unit?

Many thanks!
It’s not normal. I have a 2019 and it starts every time. I have had it outside sitting at 30 degrees and still starts first time. Haven’t had it sitting in cold temp.
 

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She'll rotella T6 synthetic 5w40 is a very popular oil for the wet clutch equipped atv's. Excellent stuff and my go to.
 

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Discussion Starter #36
She'll rotella T6 synthetic 5w40 is a very popular oil for the wet clutch equipped atv's. Excellent stuff and my go to.
Thanks, Nomad, and yeah, I figure the 5w-30 might just be a somewhat better fit for me and my location, given the fact that the Kodiak's intended use is largely in winter, and the fact that our summers rarely exceed 75-80 degrees. I think the manual calls for 5w-30 for use in ambient temps from 0-70 degrees or something like that.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
It’s not normal. I have a 2019 and it starts every time. I have had it outside sitting at 30 degrees and still starts first time. Haven’t had it sitting in cold temp.
Yeah, mine most definitely does NOT behave like that, and I'm hoping that it's a combination of the cold temps and a still very new (and tight) motor.
 

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Dude straight up. I had the same issue with my 2019 kodiak 700 686cc. Make sure you adjust your valves, pick up a valve adjuster on amazon, watch a you tube video on how to tighten your valves, save a ton of money that way, easy to do just takes awhile. About 45 mins after removing plastic body parts to get to the head covers. Right under the crotch box storage for stuff.

Body parts take between 20 mins to an hour depending on your speed/ knowledge to dismantling, again refer to youtube.

Also for cold climates, I'm in north idaho, spirit lake. Sometime -10+ for weeks at a time. Get an ac plug in heater strip for under your engine on the block itself. Get a 75-watt to a 150 watt sticky oil block heater. Plug it in before you use it like an hour or so and it will start the engine the first time everytime.

I haven't done them yet but I got'em, "wet clutch slugs", 40 bucks plus ten shipping, look on Google for them, came with new crankcase gasket. Supposed to be much better on your clutch when plowing snow or crawling. I haven't got a fuel programmer yet but I would bet in colder climates that one would work much better than without, our atv's these days eat more air than they should, they need more fuel I'm sure.

That should do it. Amsoil pure synthetic would be great to. They seem to be the best quality oil by far. Plus they have a 0w-50 pure synthetic, lasts for a long long time under stress, it's thin when cold for easier starts and thick at temp for wear protection.

Also for those that don't know, warn makes a 300 lb cable plow bucket that works great on berms and moving snow easily in steading on pushing or blowing I suppose. You would need the front plow mount from warn, warn blade of many sizes and I believe either "black bore" or " big bore" adapter kit to bucket from blade.

I hope this helps anybody that needs cold climate help. Also if you don't have full front diff lock like but need it on a base and I think mid kodiak and maybe even the grizzlys, they're is a company called 501 parts that sell kits to put to put one on yourself for under 300-500 bucks.
 

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Dude straight up. I had the same issue with my 2019 kodiak 700 686cc. Make sure you adjust your valves, pick up a valve adjuster on amazon, watch a you tube video on how to tighten your valves, save a ton of money that way, easy to do just takes awhile. About 45 mins after removing plastic body parts to get to the head covers. Right under the crotch box storage for stuff.

Body parts take between 20 mins to an hour depending on your speed/ knowledge to dismantling, again refer to youtube.

Also for cold climates, I'm in north idaho, spirit lake. Sometime -10+ for weeks at a time. Get an ac plug in heater strip for under your engine on the block itself. Get a 75-watt to a 150 watt sticky oil block heater. Plug it in before you use it like an hour or so and it will start the engine the first time everytime.

I haven't done them yet but I got'em, "wet clutch slugs", 40 bucks plus ten shipping, look on Google for them, came with new crankcase gasket. Supposed to be much better on your clutch when plowing snow or crawling. I haven't got a fuel programmer yet but I would bet in colder climates that one would work much better than without, our atv's these days eat more air than they should, they need more fuel I'm sure.

That should do it. Amsoil pure synthetic would be great to. They seem to be the best quality oil by far. Plus they have a 0w-50 pure synthetic, lasts for a long long time under stress, it's thin when cold for easier starts and thick at temp for wear protection.

Also for those that don't know, warn makes a 300 lb cable plow bucket that works great on berms and moving snow easily in steading on pushing or blowing I suppose. You would need the front plow mount from warn, warn blade of many sizes and I believe either "black bore" or " big bore" adapter kit to bucket from blade.

I hope this helps anybody that needs cold climate help. Also if you don't have full front diff lock like but need it on a base and I think mid kodiak and maybe even the grizzlys, they're is a company called 501 parts that sell kits to put to put one on yourself for under 300-500 bucks.
X2 on the Amsoil 100% synthetic but it is 0w-40 ATV/UTV (not 0w-50) they also have a 10w-40 and their new atv oil is 5w-50
 

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Also Skeeterbeater makes a great point about having the valves checked and properly adjusted for this issue. My new 2020 686cc always took 2 try's to start even in the summer. In dec. at 400 miles I checked the valves they were fine so no adjustment, so I then switched from Yamalube 10w-40 to Amsoil synthetic 10w-40 and since that oil change my 686 has started every time on the first attempt and stayed running idling perfectly just like my car and truck.
 
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