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Hey guys, I haven’t had the problem yet but seen where other people have and how it could be an issue. I just bought a 20’ 700 EPS. I’ve seen where the vent for the fuel tank that runs down the rear A-Arms seems fairly low as well as hearing some guys say that they have picked up water into the tank on a hot day crossing a creek and the rapid cooling has caused a vacuum on the vent and brought water back into the tank. Has anyone come up with a way to prevent this? Heard some guys add a inline fuel line filter and cut the tube shorter and some put a ball check valve in. Opinions?? Thanks guys!
 

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I pulled mine and my wife’s up and out extended it and ran it along the upper frame rail to the front of the atv where the rest of the lines are attached.
9990
 
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Hey guys, I haven’t had the problem yet but seen where other people have and how it could be an issue. I just bought a 20’ 700 EPS. I’ve seen where the vent for the fuel tank that runs down the rear A-Arms seems fairly low as well as hearing some guys say that they have picked up water into the tank on a hot day crossing a creek and the rapid cooling has caused a vacuum on the vent and brought water back into the tank. Has anyone come up with a way to prevent this? Heard some guys add a inline fuel line filter and cut the tube shorter and some put a ball check valve in. Opinions?? Thanks guys!
Hard for the vent tube to suck up water when it's connected to a check valve type assembly. It allows pressure to release from the tank and also prevents fuel spillage during a rollover. The way it works, there would be no way for water to enter through the vent tube

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Hard for the vent tube to suck up water when it's connected to a check valve type assembly. It allows pressure to release from the tank and also prevents fuel spillage during a rollover. The way it works, there would be no way for water to enter through the vent tube

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have you added a check valve to yours? Would love to do something like that just wanna see how everyone else is doing theirs!
 

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You would have to check or talk to a factory mechanic but the part that the hose is connected to in the top of Rob-c's picture just may be a check valve.

You could always pull the hose off and the place another hose onto it and see if you can blow into the tank to see if it is a valve of some kind. The parts diagram just says that it is a "pipe joint assembly"
 

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have you added a check valve to yours? Would love to do something like that just wanna see how everyone else is doing theirs!
No, there is already one there from factory. The pipe joint Assembly.

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You would have to check or talk to a factory mechanic but the part that the hose is connected to in the top of Rob-c's picture just may be a check valve.

You could always pull the hose off and the place another hose onto it and see if you can blow into the tank to see if it is a valve of some kind. The parts diagram just says that it is a "pipe joint assembly"
That pipe joint Assembly is essentially a check valve... A 2 way air-liquid check valve.
Inside, the center is larger than the inlet and outlet with a ball in the latter cavity. The ball moves vertically. As heated fuel builds pressure in the tank, it slightly lifts the ball allowing the pressurized vapor to escape around the ball and out the vent tube. In the event of a rollover, fuel comes up that tube and pushes the ball against the outlet end, sealing it off so as fuel doesn't leak out the vent tube.

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I ride a lot of mud and water, so that’s why I moved my hose. Yes it has a check valve but nothing is 100% and for the little bit of time & money to move my hose for a bit of extra protection was worth it to me.
 

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I had a bad problem with this. I have not had a problem Since I decided to not stop and hang out in ankle deep water.

My introduction to this forum was because of this exact problem. I had raced down the mountain with a hot machine and parked in the creek up to my ankles and sat there for about 5 or 10 minutes. I cranked my machine, and it shut right back down. Couldnt figure out what was wrong.

It took me a while to pull the fuel line from the fuel rail. And all this white color came out. Then I checked my fuel tank, and I would say over half a gallon of water was in my tank. I drained all the gas and flushed it multiple times before it was back to normal.

That valve is not a 100 percent check valve. Watch yourself and dont get trapped out far.
 

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That post above............


.....was the short story to that. Dont believe that check valve is full proof.

No Joke
 

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That post above............


.....was the short story to that. Dont believe that check valve is full proof.

No Joke
No they aren't fool proof, if they get dirt in there, that ball doesn't seal completely.

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Ive thought about doing that just nervous about fuel coming out all of the electricians up front if it ever decides to spew a little!
i routed the hose as the others are, curled down.
 

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I just checked the tag end of the hose that runs down the back of the frame and there's no check valve in there. That's a direct passage to the tank.
If you blow into the hose with the fuel cap on there's back pressure due to the tank being sealed. You can draw air for the tank and create a vacuum if you draw air long enough. Take the cap off and you can hear the air going back and forth. Not sure about the other hose that's tucked up under the fender. Since the tank is vented both ways it should never draw water into the tank but a rapid change in temperature and a hose buried in water might draw some up.

You could put a check valve on the end of the hose(s) but that would create pressure in the tank as the fuel heats up and as it is sloshed around the tank. It would prevent any water from being sucked up but likely would result in fuel spraying out of the filler cap.
 

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I just checked the tag end of the hose that runs down the back of the frame and there's no check valve in there. That's a direct passage to the tank.
If you blow into the hose with the fuel cap on there's back pressure due to the tank being sealed. You can draw air for the tank and create a vacuum if you draw air long enough. Take the cap off and you can hear the air going back and forth. Not sure about the other hose that's tucked up under the fender. Since the tank is vented both ways it should never draw water into the tank but a rapid change in temperature and a hose buried in water might draw some up.

You could put a check valve on the end of the hose(s) but that would create pressure in the tank as the fuel heats up and as it is sloshed around the tank. It would prevent any water from being sucked up but likely would result in fuel spraying out of the filler cap.
That house goes to the pipe joint, look at the image posted above. That joint is a sort of 2way check valve if you can call it that. If you blow in it, you are forcing the ball to seal to the tank side of the joint, causing the back pressure you are noticing. This also helps prevent water from going up and into the tank, it's not a 100% seal, some air will get around it. But it's sealed enough to not build enough vacuum to siphon water up into tank. When you suck on that hose, it's pulling the ball to the exit side of the joint, again not a 100% seal, this allows expanded gas vapors to escape instead of over pressurizing the tank. If the bike rolls over, the weight of the fuel presses that ball inside even tighter to the exit side, preventing a spill. There will be a small amount at first, and occasionally a few drops as it sits inverted, but not a full stream like it would be with no valve at all.

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With the fuel cap off there is zero resistance either way. If there was a ball in there I would be able to move it
I don't understand why there are two lines coming off the vent. Makes no sense to me.
 

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This also helps prevent water from going up and into the tank, it's not a 100% seal, some air will get around it. But it's sealed enough to not build enough vacuum to siphon water up into tank.
I can only hope people are seeing my posts. I did park in about ankle deep water for about 10 minutes after a hot run down a mountain.

My gas tank had ALOT of water in it. I got the gas out into clear gallon jugs, and it was clearly ALOT. I did nothing to my machine to put water in the gas tank.

I have not redirected that line, but I can imagine its a descent idea.

Not trying to start a battle of wits, thats not me
 

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I can only hope people are seeing my posts. I did park in about ankle deep water for about 10 minutes after a hot run down a mountain.

My gas tank had ALOT of water in it. I got the gas out into clear gallon jugs, and it was clearly ALOT. I did nothing to my machine to put water in the gas tank.

I have not redirected that line, but I can imagine its a descent idea.

Not trying to start a battle of wits, thats not me
Not trying to argue or call you a liar, but parts of that just don't add up, that tube doesn't extend past the bottom of the frame unless altered, and ankle deep water is what 4 to 5" at max, on a bike with almost 11" of ground clearance. You would need a good half quart/liter of water in there to really be noticable after letting it sit, maybe a bit less, but still, for any large amount to siphon up that line due to the fuel tank cooling down is just not really possible, it would require such a high pressure differential to pull water up a hose almost 3 ft. I would lean more towards water in the fuel supply source

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I shouldve made the statement that I was sitting on the bike at ankle depth. And looking back, that was not too smart for multiple reasons. But I got quit unlucky to have water in my tank.
 
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I shouldve made the statement that I was sitting on the bike at ankle depth. And looking back, that was not too smart for multiple reasons. But I got quit unlucky to have water in my tank.
No doubt, water in the tank sucks, I used to get it all the time with my old 200 big red, the local store was notorious for water in fuel, especially in winter. Luckily, it was usually ice in the bottom of my tank or Jerry cans.....
Then there was that one time my little nephew decided to fill his uncle 3 wheeler with gas from Grammy's cow **** n water garden fertilizer mix in the watering can...... Let's just say I didn't siphon that one out of the tank with my mouth on a hose....

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