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Don't just put anything into your off-road vehicle

Motor oil is just motor oil, right? Wrong! Your ATV or UTV requires motor oil just like any other motorized vehicle, but any oil just doesn’t cut it. These machines run at higher RPM, work harder and run harder than your truck does, so specialized oils are definitely called for. What separates motor sports oil from common stuff off the shelf? It’s all about what goes into the blend. Let’s take a look at five of the best motor oil products for your off-road fun.

Check out the article here: http://www.atv.com/blog/2017/06/five-best-motor-oil-options-atvs-utvs.html
 

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Without checking their prices I would be willing to bet that they are also some of the most expensive. Then when they add that ATV designation the price goes up a little bit more.

The Rotella T6 5w40 is a fine oil.

I myself like Valvoline Full Synthetic oils.

Just make sure that the oil that you use is rated for the machine that you are putting it in. For our Kodiak 700's it need to be rated SG or higher.
 
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Here is a little update that is very interesting. Rotella T6 has been a 5W40 full synthetic, but now it is available in a 15W40 full synthetic. That is a bit concerning to me, but I have not researched it.
 

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Plain 10w40 Yamalube in mine
 

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Here is a little update that is very interesting. Rotella T6 has been a 5W40 full synthetic, but now it is available in a 15W40 full synthetic. That is a bit concerning to me, but I have not researched it.
why is it concerning? Rotella T6 is diesel oil, and the most common oil grade in the world for diesel engines is 15w40. It's just one more grade added to the t6 line
 

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Yamalube is a great product, available in many different types and viscosities . I’ve owned over a dozen Yamaha’s over the last 18 years , motocrossers, street bikes, recreational machines, and always had great results, besides my son is a pro motocrosser and I get it next to nothing. I can’t beat that. I have owned many other brands and usually anything to do with Yamaha is a great or superior product.
 

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Yamalube is a great product, available in many different types and viscosities . I’ve owned over a dozen Yamaha’s over the last 18 years , motocrossers, street bikes, recreational machines, and always had great results, besides my son is a pro motocrosser and I get it next to nothing. I can’t beat that. I have owned many other brands and usually anything to do with Yamaha is a great or superior product.

Yamaha like other brands just use a supplier to manufacture their parts and fluids to their specifications and then double the price from what you would pay otherwise. If you like it and get it for a good price then stick with it.

I just as soon as save a few bucks and go with someone else for a product that is just as good if not better.
 

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Yamaha like other brands just use a supplier to manufacture their parts and fluids to their specifications and then double the price from what you would pay otherwise. If you like it and get it for a good price then stick with it.

I just as soon as save a few bucks and go with someone else for a product that is just as good if not better.
Exactly! Like any rebrander, Yamaha buys their product from the lowest bidder meeting their specs. I don't know if they changed providers but ESSO has made yamalube for the Canadian market and CITGO has made it for the US market for a number of years. If one was to find the ESSO or CITGO equivelent, they'd be getting their yamalube for half price.
 

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One way to think about Yamalube is that it's the type of oil the engineers expect to be run in the machine. When you understand what the equivalent is it's easy to match it up but if you're not sure you can be confident putting Yamalube in.
 

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Just look at the ratings on the side of the bottle. As long as the oil meets or exceeds what Yamaha specifies on the API rating you are fine.

I have no idea what the current API rating is for Yamalube but I am sure that there are a number of oils out there that are cheaper and exceed their API rating. Including the Valvoline that I am using
 

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CanadianKodiak700, you asked why I was concerned about now making a 15W40 when Rotella has a 5W40. My concern is that when you have one that covers the entire range, whey do we need the 15W40?

Sorry for the late reply!
 

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CanadianKodiak700, you asked why I was concerned about now making a 15W40 when Rotella has a 5W40. My concern is that when you have one that covers the entire range, whey do we need the 15W40?



Sorry for the late reply!
Very simple, in warmer climates, the diesel engine doesn't need an oil that flows like a 5 weight in winter temps, so regular 15weight low temp viscosity is fine, it's usually cheaper for the customer, and the manufacturer has no need to spend extra on additives and compounds to reduce viscosity for temp it won't see, saving them money on manufacturing costs.

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Just look at the ratings on the side of the bottle. As long as the oil meets or exceeds what Yamaha specifies on the API rating you are fine.



I have no idea what the current API rating is for Yamalube but I am sure that there are a number of oils out there that are cheaper and exceed their API rating. Including the Valvoline that I am using
I love valvoline oils, but you have more than the aAPI cert to go by, it's your valvoline JASO ma or ma2 certified also? That's the wet clutch cert, the most important property of oil for our engines.

As far as the API cert goes on pretty much any oil on the shelf anywhere, cheap no name to expensive premium oils, conventional or synthetic, will meet and most likely exceed the lubricating needs of any atv engine on the market provided it's writing proper viscosity specs.

What valvoline oil is it you use exactly? If it's JASO ma/ma2 certified, awesome. I'll bet it's on the less expensive side too, one of my reasons I always used to use valvoline

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