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Controller and exhaust tip up for sale. The controller combined with the tip added quite a bit of power but it was LOUD! I tend to sneak thru areas in the Cascades I'm not "technically" supposed to ride. Decided to sacrifice power and comfort for quietness so put the stock tip back on and removed controller. I would like to recoup some of my dinero, drop me a PM
 

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I thought the same thing when I did a 2R tip. Sounded great, but lost all stealth capabilities.
Pulled it off after a couple short rides.

Ended up going with a HMF Titan QS (quiet) slip-on, and pretty happy with it. Technically it's only 1db louder than stock, but it sounds completely different.
 

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I installed the controller I bought from Ronbo and did the AIS delete. I ran an apples to apples test 2 days apart. On Tuesday I ran the same route/speeds before the mods and Friday with the mods. It was roughly 90 degrees with high humidity both days.


The heat from the motor area and the storage box has reduced significantly (30-40%). I wore shorts both days and Tuesday I couldn't touch the plastics with my legs after about 30 minutes. The heat difference in the storage box is much much lower. On Tuesday I had around 15 backfires in 45 minutes. On Friday I think I heard one!


The weekend before the install I ran the bike hard at my hunting lease. Plus 90 degree heat with slow riding (5-10mph) in the woods for hours. I had a ton of sputtering and shutting off. This Saturday I used it in a similar situation but had zero shut off's or sputtering.


The power has increased as well. On takeoff it got a small bump, but midrange got a very nice bump. I can tell that with an airbox mod this bike would really make a jump!


Overall , I highly recommend this mod!
 

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I installed the controller I bought from Ronbo and did the AIS delete. I ran an apples to apples test 2 days apart. On Tuesday I ran the same route/speeds before the mods and Friday with the mods. It was roughly 90 degrees with high humidity both days.


The heat from the motor area and the storage box has reduced significantly (30-40%). I wore shorts both days and Tuesday I couldn't touch the plastics with my legs after about 30 minutes. The heat difference in the storage box is much much lower. On Tuesday I had around 15 backfires in 45 minutes. On Friday I think I heard one!


The weekend before the install I ran the bike hard at my hunting lease. Plus 90 degree heat with slow riding (5-10mph) in the woods for hours. I had a ton of sputtering and shutting off. This Saturday I used it in a similar situation but had zero shut off's or sputtering.


The power has increased as well. On takeoff it got a small bump, but midrange got a very nice bump. I can tell that with an airbox mod this bike would really make a jump!


Overall , I highly recommend this mod!
X2, I also did these mods. I bought the cuervo racing block off plate too, which ,made the delete look nice and clean. Overall, machine seems to run MUCH better, much less engine heat. I recommend these mods and am very happy with them, it made me like my Kodiak better.
 

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On the engine running cooler, is that actual verified with a coolant temperature gauge or just seat of the pants?

To make a engine run cooler you need more air flow across the radiator, or less fuel or a combination of both.

I know what manufactures claim that their equipment will do but it very seldom actually does it. If bolting on this piece increases the horsepower by 5% and this part by 3% and this other part by 10% then you could double the HP output of the engine by just adding a few parts. The problem is it doesn't work that way.

I built performance VW engines for over 30 years and I was always fighting the engine temperature.
 

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On the engine running cooler, is that actual verified with a coolant temperature gauge or just seat of the pants?

To make a engine run cooler you need more air flow across the radiator, or less fuel or a combination of both.

I know what manufactures claim that their equipment will do but it very seldom actually does it. If bolting on this piece increases the horsepower by 5% and this part by 3% and this other part by 10% then you could double the HP output of the engine by just adding a few parts. The problem is it doesn't work that way.

I built performance VW engines for over 30 years and I was always fighting the engine temperature.
Seat of the pants. But very noticeable heat reduction...
 

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I have found that on my Kodiak that a couple of miles per hour will increase the air flow enough to the point that you won't notice the heat.

A couple of weekends ago I was just putting around my new hunting area just checking it out. As I was just creeping along I could feel the heat out of the side vents onto my left leg. I found that if I just increased the speed just a bit the airflow increased enough to the point that I had to put my hand down near the vents to actually feel the heat and I could no longer feel the heat on my leg.

The thing with tuning is that when X amount of gas is burned you create X amount of heat and unless the tuning is decreasing the amount of fuel burnt it is going to create the same amount of heat to pass out of the exhaust. The best way to get it to run cooler is to add airflow across the exhaust pipe. You can do this with either a fan or some ducting that will direct cool air across the exhaust pipe. With added air you will notice a difference in temperature through the vents. This is where I have been looking a little at a fan setup that will blow cooler air across the pipes and out of the vents, but I haven't really gotten that far with it. It is just in the idea stage.
 

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Modern engines are much leaner and that's what makes them hotter.
If all you do to a bike is add more (enough) fuel the temp will lower.
It's all about getting the stoichiometric down to a more sane level.
 

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So what's going to happen to my Kodiak in say 3 to 5 years if I leave it stock with no controller?? I would figure Yamaha designed this Quad to last as long as all the other years they produced. I had mine out for the first all day ride 2 weeks ago and it ran like a top all stock.
 

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So what's going to happen to my Kodiak in say 3 to 5 years if I leave it stock with no controller?? I would figure Yamaha designed this Quad to last as long as all the other years they produced. I had mine out for the first all day ride 2 weeks ago and it ran like a top all stock.
On year 3 with our 700's. Both run like champs. All stock as far as fuel system and electronic programming.
 

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So what's going to happen to my Kodiak in say 3 to 5 years if I leave it stock with no controller?? I would figure Yamaha designed this Quad to last as long as all the other years they produced. I had mine out for the first all day ride 2 weeks ago and it ran like a top all stock.
No reason for the engine not to last for many miles and years in stock form.
 

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So what's going to happen to my Kodiak in say 3 to 5 years if I leave it stock with no controller?? I would figure Yamaha designed this Quad to last as long as all the other years they produced. I had mine out for the first all day ride 2 weeks ago and it ran like a top all stock.
The reality is, it's just guessing and speculation how long the 16 and up machines will last in stock (or modified ,for that matter) form. Previous models were not built too such strict emissions standards. Like it or not, as standards tighten,engines will become more restricted. This will surely hurt longevity. Try breathing through a straw for a few minutes and then imagine trying it long term lol.
 

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The reality is, it's just guessing and speculation how long the 16 and up machines will last in stock (or modified ,for that matter) form. Previous models were not built too such strict emissions standards. Like it or not, as standards tighten,engines will become more restricted. This will surely hurt longevity. Try breathing through a straw for a few minutes and then imagine trying it long term lol.
Fact is in 2016 the 708 was the most powerful engine ever produced for Yamaha utility Atv.. Don't really get how you call that too restricted to breath and make power.


Also 2014 - 2015 686cc Grizzlys are well documented (by EHS) very lean running engines as to meet tight emmission standards. These engines have already been out for half a decade and many have high mileage. Not once I've I ever heard of a failure of this generation thus fare.

All modern cars and trucks all contend with tight emmission standards and yet in many instances make twice the horsepower of simular sized engines from 30 years ago without giving up any long term reliability.
 

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I mean restricted in the sense they have to comply with the same standards as on road vehicles now. Catylitic converters are restrictive to a a degree which increases with usage. They are making them run leaner and leaner to comply and the engines are running hotter consequently. Too much heat is not a good thing. The plastics have even melted on some of them.

As far as the modern vehicles go, how do you know they aren't giving up long term reliability? Look at the trend toward smaller displacement turbo charged engines. Very expensive to maintain as mileage piles on. Even the makers known for long term reliability are seeing more issues. I know of a couple of Eco boost Ford trucks that have had expensive power train issues so far.
 

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I mean restricted in the sense they have to comply with the same standards as on road vehicles now. Catylitic converters are restrictive to a a degree which increases with usage. They are making them run leaner and leaner to comply and the engines are running hotter consequently. Too much heat is not a good thing. The plastics have even melted on some of them.

As far as the modern vehicles go, how do you know they aren't giving up long term reliability? Look at the trend toward smaller displacement turbo charged engines. Very expensive to maintain as mileage piles on. Even the makers known for long term reliability are seeing more issues. I know of a couple of Eco boost Ford trucks that have had expensive power train issues so far.
Lol!

Certainly can't argu with the Eco boost point. I've known a few people with issues to!

Obviously you are right. Only time will tell.

I'll admit, I'm more of a fan of the 686s Gens.
 
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