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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all. I am a proud new owner of a 2018 kodiak eps se. I purchased my bike last monday and will be picking it up this tuesday. While i was researching which atv to buy, i noticed a few recurring threads of ways to upgrade the kodiak. Those threads revolved around: grizzly 18gram weights, ehs' racing airbox and controller.
I like the idea of increased power out of the hole, and not dusting my engine.
Any thoughts on any of the items would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
 

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I went with 17g Dr Pulley OD weights.

They give more top speed as they are shaped and not circular like the stock weights.


EHS has two great air filter kits I went with their Uni filter kit.


JBS Performance has a great sheave, upgraded secondary spring, and they sell the wet slug clutch kit too.


In the performance scene there are three styles of tuners.
Two are piggyback units that stay on the bike, and the third is a ECU tuner that is removed after tuning the ECU.

1. The one with buttons you push are entry level and they do a decent job of preventing a too lean condition and provide a decent level of tuning with a built in base map by who ever is selling them.


2. The PCV is just on a whole different level as it is fully adjustable controlling fuel mapping at every 250rpm and at all levels of throttle position, but also allows for ignition timing above 2,500 rpm that is fully adjustable by throttle position along with a rev limiter that can be changed by sending a request by email to get a code for your requested rev limit.


3. ECU tuning where the tuning device is removed from the bike after a map is made and downloaded onto the factory ECU.
The ECU retains the new map, and it is just as complex as a PCV map, but allows timing changes throughout the entire rpm spectrum. Maximus makes a really good one, but I don't know if they make one for Kodiaks yet.


JBS Performance is getting into ECU tuning where he mails out a pre-tuned ECU for specific performance component configurations so it's plug and play.
You can call James to find out the particulars for those as I've never used them (they are new).
I told James I was adding a HMF Titan quiet muffler and he sent me a PCV with his map loaded for that scenario. It was plug and play.


FYI: No matter which type of fuel tuner you pick the guy doing the tune is the most important bit needed. I've had a local guy at a big shop do a tune that was ok, and end the end I rode 2000 miles to Iowa to get one of the top three guys to tune my Victory street bike (Rylan Vos).

With the Maximus tuner companies like 801 Motorworx can tune your bike over the internet if you live too far away from a dyno tuner...they tell you to go ride it a certain way then download the results then they make corrections and send you out again to gather more data by riding specific ways...it's like a slow dyno tune.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I went with 17g Dr Pulley OD weights.

They give more top speed as they are shaped and not circular like the stock weights.


EHS has two great air filter kits I went with their Uni filter kit.


JBS Performance has a great sheave, upgraded secondary spring, and they sell the wet slug clutch kit too.


In the performance scene there are three styles of tuners.
Two are piggyback units that stay on the bike, and the third is a ECU tuner that is removed after tuning the ECU.

1. The one with buttons you push are entry level and they do a decent job of preventing a too lean condition and provide a decent level of tuning with a built in base map by who ever is selling them.


2. The PCV is just on a whole different level as it is fully adjustable controlling fuel mapping at every 250rpm and at all levels of throttle position, but also allows for ignition timing above 2,500 rpm that is fully adjustable by throttle position along with a rev limiter that can be changed by sending a request by email to get a code for your requested rev limit.


3. ECU tuning where the tuning device is removed from the bike after a map is made and downloaded onto the factory ECU.
The ECU retains the new map, and it is just as complex as a PCV map, but allows timing changes throughout the entire rpm spectrum. Maximus makes a really good one, but I don't know if they make one for Kodiaks yet.


JBS Performance is getting into ECU tuning where he mails out a pre-tuned ECU for specific performance component configurations so it's plug and play.
You can call James to find out the particulars for those as I've never used them (they are new).
I told James I was adding a HMF Titan quiet muffler and he sent me a PCV with his map loaded for that scenario. It was plug and play.


FYI: No matter which type of fuel tuner you pick the guy doing the tune is the most important bit needed. I've had a local guy at a big shop do a tune that was ok, and end the end I rode 2000 miles to Iowa to get one of the top three guys to tune my Victory street bike (Rylan Vos).

With the Maximus tuner companies like 801 Motorworx can tune your bike over the internet if you live too far away from a dyno tuner...they tell you to go ride it a certain way then download the results then they make corrections and send you out again to gather more data by riding specific ways...it's like a slow dyno tune.
Thanks for the reply. Lots of good info.

How are you liking your weights? Top end speed is not that big of a deal for me but it wouldnt hurt to have it if there are no downsides. I like the idea of installing the grizzly weights, because they are designed for the kodiaks setup.

Im open to doing some additional things with the clutch. Was thinking about doing more over the winter, after ive got some miles on it, but if it makes sense to do them now, since ill already have it open, then i would. Are there some tried and true setups for the 2018s? I read that clutch kits may not be worth the money, and that messing with the wet clutch is risky. I would be open to changing the secondary spring and shimming the clutch, along with changing the weights. Its my first atv and i am a bit nervous about doing something that may not be good for the bike, long term.

What made you decide to go with the uni kit as opposed to the k&n kit? Did you get the complete kit or just the base one?

As far as the tuner, my main concern is dealing with the lean condition, especially after adding the filter. I realize that there are more benefits to adding a more customizable controller but i dont have the capabilities to program them, which makes me nervous. I live in mn, and iowa isnt too far away. Do you feel like the time and money you put into getting your machine tuned was worth it?

In the end, im looking for more low end power. I tend to be a cautious person and dont have a lot of interest in going 60mph on my bike. Though, im sure it will happen from time to time, as i will be riding with friends. I enjoy riding in the mud and would like to be able to wheelie, if possible. I can do some basic wrenching and have a friend with a shop that can help me with more involved projects, but only want to do upgrades that will not sacrifice the longevity of the machine. Thanks again for the reply!
 

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The bikes now days have to get past the EPA so they come lean from the factory.
My goal on add-ons is to make the bike live longer while performing at it's best, and I didn't want any negative aspects or reliability issues to be included.
The reason I picked the Yamaha was because it was the king in drive train reliability with the no slip belt design.

I just went through the first oil change including both diff's., and got to romp on it a little more yesterday. It was very lively. The difference of before and after is noticeable. It's a more trail friendly rig.
Top speed isn't my overall goal either as most of my riding is below 50mph, but it's nice to have, and no downside to the weights. They're just engineered better.

I went with the uni because they are common dirt bike filters and I've seen the K&N's have to use a sock over them for dirt use and I didn't want to fiddle with that. For street I'd gone the other direction.

Most clutch changes can be done at anytime, but if you do the slug kit sooner your wet clutch will last much longer. Slow riding in high, plowing snow, and pulling heavy loads can destroy the clutch in it's stock configuration. Go fast and light, or get the kit. I plunk on trails a lot and plan on plowing this winter.

The sheave replacement allows for more bottom end and more top end, and the purple secondary spring dictates the rpm range the engine experience...still conservative but up slightly for quicker power.

As far as I know Rylan only does Victory and now Indian street cruisers.

As far as wrenching...having air or electric impact helps, all the nuts are normal except the one that holds the wet clutch on and it's left handed threads. The only moderately difficult thing is the secondary spring replacement and that's only because I had to make a spring compressor using tools I had laying around. I barely loosened up the nut with an impact, then installed the compressor then spun the nut off with my finger tip.

The nut holding the wet clutch on is a staked nut, but it comes off easily with air. I re-staked it and used red loctite on that nut...blue on all the others.

I also blocked off the AIS by installing a vacuum plug on the air box and underneath the hose after being inspired by this video. Visually it's invisible.

Get a box of ziploc sandwich bags and a sharpie and number them 1 ,2, 3, etc along with the description of the bolts as your removing them. When it comes time to put things back together just start on the highest numerical bag and work your way down to bag 1.

A really good tune is worth it. What you end up with is a bike that has excellent manners at all throttle positions, and smooth power delivery.

Here is one I found that shows a little of what happens to an engine from a wet clutch failure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The bikes now days have to get past the EPA so they come lean from the factory.
My goal on add-ons is to make the bike live longer while performing at it's best, and I didn't want any negative aspects or reliability issues to be included.
The reason I picked the Yamaha was because it was the king in drive train reliability with the no slip belt design.

I just went through the first oil change including both diff's., and got to romp on it a little more yesterday. It was very lively. The difference of before and after is noticeable. It's a more trail friendly rig.
Top speed isn't my overall goal either as most of my riding is below 50mph, but it's nice to have, and no downside to the weights. They're just engineered better.

I went with the uni because they are common dirt bike filters and I've seen the K&N's have to use a sock over them for dirt use and I didn't want to fiddle with that. For street I'd gone the other direction.

Most clutch changes can be done at anytime, but if you do the slug kit sooner your wet clutch will last much longer. Slow riding in high, plowing snow, and pulling heavy loads can destroy the clutch in it's stock configuration. Go fast and light, or get the kit. I plunk on trails a lot and plan on plowing this winter.

The sheave replacement allows for more bottom end and more top end, and the purple secondary spring dictates the rpm range the engine experience...still conservative but up slightly for quicker power.

As far as I know Rylan only does Victory and now Indian street cruisers.

As far as wrenching...having air or electric impact helps, all the nuts are normal except the one that holds the wet clutch on and it's left handed threads. The only moderately difficult thing is the secondary spring replacement and that's only because I had to make a spring compressor using tools I had laying around. I barely loosened up the nut with an impact, then installed the compressor then spun the nut off with my finger tip.

The nut holding the wet clutch on is a staked nut, but it comes off easily with air. I re-staked it and used red loctite on that nut...blue on all the others.

I also blocked off the AIS by installing a vacuum plug on the air box and underneath the hose after being inspired by this video. Visually it's invisible.

Get a box of ziploc sandwich bags and a sharpie and number them 1 ,2, 3, etc along with the description of the bolts as your removing them. When it comes time to put things back together just start on the highest numerical bag and work your way down to bag 1.

A really good tune is worth it. What you end up with is a bike that has excellent manners at all throttle positions, and smooth power delivery.

Here is one I found that shows a little of what happens to an engine from a wet clutch failure.
More good info. Thanks again. Im at work so i dont have time to respond to everything but will this evening. One quick question: i saw some clutch kits from jbs that seem to include all of the clutch upgrades you are describing. Something like this: https://jbsperformance.com/product/kodiak-700-hot-rod-extreme-clutch-kit-w-secondary-spring-greases/
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks again for the reply. Definitely learned a bit since starting this thread. I am interested in getting the kit. Hoping for some other people to chime in with any thoughts or experiences. There are a lot of options out there. Hopefully this thread combined with more research can help me make the right decision. Thanks again for the info. Its been very helpful
 

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I did the 20g weights and orange epi back spring. Uni standard airfilter upgrade 2r exhaust tip and its a huge difference. I also have a 2018 se eps
 

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Thanks again for the reply. Definitely learned a bit since starting this thread. I am interested in getting the kit. Hoping for some other people to chime in with any thoughts or experiences. There are a lot of options out there. Hopefully this thread combined with more research can help me make the right decision. Thanks again for the info. Its been very helpful
I don't own a Kodiak nor do I have experience with JBS products, but I have spent alot of time reading, learning and modifying my own CVT in my 2009 Grizzly 550 using the abundant info on the GrizzlyCentral.com web site. In my case I run a Coop45 machined sheave.

I was really surprised how often I've read about Grizzly owners who spent good money on 400, 500$ JBS kits, and thought they had an amazing Clutch set ups, only to realize their bikes don't perform much or any better then their buddy's Grizzlys witch had nothing more then an 1.5mm shim and an EPI purple spring at a total cost 50$. Point is It's your money, do what makes you happy, just thought I'd share some of the info I've come upon on the other website.

P.S. I have read many good things on the subject of wet Clutch slugs.
 
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